Economic inequality is all our responsibility

It’s sad to hear that Equality West Midlands is going to become inactive for the foreseeable future. But I hope this decision becomes the catalyst for a greater profile for income inequality in the rest of our work. The group has only ceased its activities because its members are keen, committed activists in other groups and just ran out of time for this newer one-issue group. Like them, we share responsibility for addressing income equality through the rest of our activism.

Inequality is a major symptom of the centralised, remotely owned and parasitic economy that neoliberalism has created for us, and provenly a cause of social and environmental ills. Addressing it is a major driver of the work Localise WM does towards an economy in which we all share power and ownership. Needless to say, the so-called austerity agenda is not improving matters: rough sleeping has doubled in the UK since 2010; and debts and low, insecure incomes are leaving people vulnerable to economic shocks. The Divide Film, on general release in April, gives us an opportunity to raise the issue publicly.

Whether or not there’s an active local Equality group, we all have to remember how economic inequality affects everything we work on, and make it central to the progressive alternatives we’re proposing and a driver of political engagement – both in the West Midlands and across the UK.

Karen Leach

Dear friends,

This is probably one of the hardest emails I’ve ever had to write, but a necessary one.

Last month, the Equality West Midlands committee decided that the group should no longer be active. The main reason for this decision was due to other commitments taking up of the committee’s time and energy. It was also felt that over the course of nearly five years, the group has done all it can to promote the cause of reducing income inequality in the West Midlands region.

Equality West Midlands has had a good run: we’ve held several big events including debates and talks involving key writers on income inequality; we took part in the A41 Photography Project; we met politicians including former MP Clare Short and Birmingham City Council cabinet member John Cotton; we attended the Council’s Social Inclusion Commission meetings; members ran workshops on aspects of inequality at two Quaker conferences; we even held a picnic! Finally, over the last year, our work with Compass West Midlands has developed into the West Midlands Politics of Networks which has seen a dramatic increase in the numbers of people and organisations involved.

During that time, the public have been made aware of the problem- locally, regionally and nationally. Local media often focus on the consequences of high inequality in Birmingham, whilst there have been several TV programmes concentrating on tax havens, the lives of the poorest in our society, and the effects on health. Surveys of public opinion frequently show that inequality is rising up in people’s concerns.

With other issues in the spotlight, though, it remains to be seen whether the media, the public and politicians will continue to take the problem seriously. Nevertheless, there is still scope for campaigning work: for example, on promoting a Living Wage. If there are groups and individuals in Birmingham who would like to do work around these issues, Equality West Midlands will be more than happy to support them.

There are a number of people I’d like to thank for their contributions to the development of Equality West Midlands:

  • The staff of the Priory Rooms, a venue where EWM held so many of their meetings;
  • Richard Wilkinson, Danny Dorling, Stewart Lansley, Joy Warmington, Clare Short and Professor Karen Rowlinson for taking the time to speak to the group;
  • Councillors James Mackay and John Cotton for taking a real interest in the group’s views;
  • Karen Leach, head of Localise West Midlands, who has always supported the group;
  • Bill Kerry from The Equality Trust who’s supported the group from Day One;
  • Everybody who’s ever joined the Facebook group, followed us on Twitter, received our emails, taken a leaflet, talked to us or attended one of our events!
  • Finally, the man who had the idea to start the group, Chris Burgess, deserves thanks.

Special thanks goes to Gilly Cooper, Shaz Rahman and Barbara and David Forbes: every one of these four was at the first ever meeting of the group on June 1st 2011 and has been a constant for EWM. I am sincerely grateful for their work, support and, fundamentally, friendship.

Over the last five years, I’ve personally learnt a lot about income inequality: how it has developed; the immediate consequences; alternative ways of working that could reduce the problem. The field of income inequality can feel like an overwhelming subject because there are so many layers to it- there is no magic bullet solution, and even the smallest of improvements may require a complete overhaul of mind-sets and government policy before we can make headway.

When I first joined the group, I felt that inequality was at the roots of everything wrong with British society. Now, though, I know it is. I hope that Equality West Midlands will in the future become active once again, but in the meantime, will continue to struggle in other ways to reduce inequality- and I hope Equality West Midlands supporters will do the same.

See you down the road,

Tom Pratt (Chair)

Does Birmingham Love the Brum Pound?

News from the Birmingham Pound, thanks to a little group of dedicated people – and you can perhaps help us… We’ve been joined by two brilliant new members with real live time to commit to the project: Ridhi Kalaria and Matthew Rowe. Ridhi, founder of Ort Cafe, ran our event for Small Business Saturday which saw 90-odd percent of attendees support the idea, and has gone on to star in this excellent short video explaining the Birmingham Pound idea for our Love Brum application.

Love Brum is a membership-based funder: members put money into the pot, and then vote for their favourite projects. They like to fund things that make Birmingham a better place (an EVEN better place!) and like the Birmingham Pound, they are keen to reach all corners of the city. If you are a member, please have a look and consider voting for this! Consider joining anyway – it’s a great fundraising idea.

Matthew, previously of the Envirolution Network in Manchester, has now relocated to our much more exciting city. IbuprofenHe has produced a comprehensive and slightly mind-boggling spreadsheet of Birmingham Pound costings under different funding scenarios, which other members are now  scrutinising carefully…

Matthew and Ridhi have also produced us a Brum Pound website, Twitter profile and Facebook page, so please sign up, follow or like as is your preference!

And keep watching this space – plenty more progress to follow shortly.

Karen Leach

Joint coordinator

Localism: a rescue plan for British democracy

A notable omission from Localise West Midlands’ extensive range of articles about, or with references to localism, is a review of a book by Simon Jenkins: Big Bang Localism: a rescue plan for British democracy.

big bang localismIn this book he attributes the decline in British voter interest and participation to the over-centralisation of power in Whitehall, ‘one of the most centralised governments in the West’. As turnouts in elections are dwindling, he notes, many are turning to ad hoc pressure groups and direct action.

Centralisation has not worked well, Jenkins believes; levels of satisfaction with health care, education and policing are lower in Britain than almost anywhere in the developed world. He notes a change in public opinion which once, on the whole, believed that the British government works well and is now shifting to a belief that it needs improving, citing contemporary YouGov polls showing a rise in discontent with public services and health care

Twelve years later the need to heed Jenkins’ pre Corbyn message has never been greater as the established on the political left and right frantically attempt to discredit and unseat a democratically elected party leader.

He noted that Britain’s local councillors are outnumbered three-to-one by 60,000 unelected people serving on roughly 5,200 local quangos, managing various functions that may be local but are no longer under local democratic control. Examples include health service, housing, prisons, training and economic development.

Jenkins points out that, across Europe, countries have spent the past two decades refreshing their local democracy – even traditionally centralised countries like France have devolved. The USA operates the most decentralised system of government and in these countries, public services are delivered more locally than in Britain – and win greater public trust as a result.

He sets out a programme for a ‘democratic Big Bang’, to return power to the local level, including control over health, police and education services, to re-enfranchise the British people:

Counties and cities should run:

  • health services
  • secondary schools
  • policing
  • the prison and probation services
  • youth employment and training
  • planning.

Municipalities and parishes should run whatever gives a community its pride and visual character:

  • primary schools
  • old people’s homes
  • nurseries and day-care centres
  • clinics and surgeries
  • parks and sports centres.

Local services should mostly be funded by local taxation, which should be raised from a combination of:

  • residential property tax
  • business rates
  • local income tax.

Jenkins proposes that central government funding of local services should take the form of a block grant, determined by the Local Democracy Commissioner and paid to local authorities with no strings attached.

The “enemies of localism” are vested interests and the national media, but devolution in Scotland and Wales shows that people prefer decisions about local services to be made locally. Simon Jenkins recommends that the Big Bang should start with a “bonfire of central controls” and an end to targets and official league tables, adding “Big Bang Localism is the answer to the failure of Britain’s public services and the loss of faith in British democracy”.

Update: International Alliance for Localisation

Early in December this blog reported that Local Futures has gathered a cross-cultural, North-South network of thinkers, activists and NGOs – the International Alliance for Localization (IAL). It already has members from over 30 countries and Localise West Midlands is one of the member organisations.

isec report coverIn the wake of the Paris climate talks, Local Futures has released a 16 page action paper entitled Climate Change or System Change? (left).

It argues that globalization – the deregulation of trade and finance through an ongoing series of “free trade” treaties – is the driving force behind climate change.

The climate problem can only be tackled effectively if governments stop subsidising globalisation, and begin pursuing a localisation agenda instead.

A recording of Local Futures’ first webinar, with community economist Michael Shuman and Helena Norberg is now uploaded on YouTube.

Climate Change or System Change? will be the focus of the second international webinar in January, as part of the Global to Local webinar series. More information will follow soon.

Contact via http://www.localfutures.org/contact-us/

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See in more detail: https://britain2020.wordpress.com/2016/01/03/localisation-a-systemic-solution-multiplier-simultaneously-lowering-co2-emissions-restoring-democracy-and-providing-secure-livelihoods-part-1/

Brief extracts from the 16 page action paper entitled Climate Change or System Change? – may be seen here: https://britain2020.wordpress.com/localisation-systemic-solution-multiplier-part-2/

 

Crickhowell’s tax plan: an example of ‘people power’ raising awareness of injustice and HMRC’s failures

crickhowell 3

Crickhowell has an independent high street with very few of the trading names which now dominate look-alike urban and suburban commercial centres. The town made news earlier this year after offering shares to residents at £50 each to buy their Grade II listed Corn Exchange pub from Punch Taverns to avoid it being used as a convenience store by one of the large retail chains.

The FT reports that the town’s traders, including a salmon smokery, local coffee shop, book shop, optician and bakery have now submitted tax plans to HMRC, using the offshore arrangements favoured by multinationals. They hope that their ‘tax rebellion’ will spread to other towns forcing the Government to tackle how Amazon, for example, paid £11.9 million tax last year on £5.3 billion of UK sales.

The details of the scheme are not in the public domain, but townspeople say it involves shifting intangible assets to the Isle of Man and setting up a trading arm in the Netherlands.

High street coffee shop owner Steve said: ‘I have always paid every penny of tax I owe, and I don’t object to that. What I object to is paying my full tax when my big name competitors are doing the damnedest to dodge theirs.’ Starbucks, for example, has paid £8.6million in UK corporation tax since it opened its first shop in London’s Kings Road in 1998, funnelling revenues/royalties out of the UK and into the Netherlands and Switzerland where they have been offered better tax deals.

Retailers are ‘trying to create a level playing field’ by changing the law

Jo Carthew, who runs Crickhowell’s Black Mountain Smokery told the Independent: “We do want to pay our taxes because we all use local schools and hospitals but we want a change of law so everyone pays their fair share”.

Samantha Devos of Number Eighteen café cites the example of Facebook, which paid less than £5000 in corporate tax last year, according to the government’s ‘tax gap’ report, and insists that spending cuts would not be needed if big companies paid their tax.Steve Askew, the local baker, says the traders never intended to put the tax plan into practice. Their goal is to embarrass big companies and the government. “Any right-thinking person accepts we have to pay taxes. What people can’t accept is the injustice,” he added.

Despite the findings of the government’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC) – massive staff redundancies and poor performance – HMRC has responded by pointing to its extra funding to crack down on multinational avoidance and this April’s introduction of the diverted profits tax, a new “Google tax” on multinationals moving profits out of the UK. It also publishes estimates of the difference between tax paid and the amount that should be paid. This attributes just £1bn of the £34bn gap to tax avoidance.

HMRC speaking with ‘forked tongue’? Is it actually in meltdown? See the Committee of Public Accounts’ report on Revenue and Customs (summary and pdf): “HMRC still failing UK taxpayers”.

Financial tools supporting the local economy: the world’s first crowd-funded fee free payment app

“There seems be a real appetite among consumers to buy from independent retailers and support community shopping”

droplet header

Those who have been expressing interest in Localise West Midlands’s involvement with a future Birmingham Pound will also read the Birmingham Press account of Birmingham’s Droplet a mobile app born in Birmingham promising a ‘customer loyalty revolution’.

droplet snapshot 1a brum

The Press reports: “Droplet, the brainchild of tech entrepreneurs Steffan Aquarone and Will Grant, has used £575,000 of Crowdfunding to take the world’s first fee free payment app into eight cities across the UK. More than 300 independent retailers across Cambridge, Edinburgh, Exeter, Glasgow, Leeds, Manchester and Norwich are now accepting transactions by using the simple mobile app . . . The first eight cities have been chosen due to their vibrant independent scenes and their willingness to embrace new idea. Local ambassadors, who are well known in the community, have been appointed in each location to work with merchants to introduce the technology and grow the Droplet brand organically. With user numbers now over 23,000, there are plans already in place to build on the initial rollout by targeting another ten cities in 2016.

Will Grant says: “Birmingham is still a critically important city for us. This is where the Droplet story all began and we have just strengthened our team here to include new ambassador Laura Patricia Jones. She will be charged with building on our existing merchant base of 35 retailers and growing our user numbers in the city.”

droplet snapshot 3 brum

Using Droplet is simple for the consumer, just tap ‘pay here’ when entering a registered outlet for the first time and the payment is taken directly from your chosen card – you’ll get a notification on your phone to show how much you’ve been charged and the reward stamps you’ve earned.


For further information, please visit www.dropletpay.com follow @dropletpay on twitter or watch the launch video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzG1cO1-jXA

Local development as a strategic alternative in Fife

Once again many will question the dependence on a global market economy as headlines shout, “China’s ‘Black Monday’ sends markets reeling”. For months, in a range of publications, Mohamed El-Erian, who chairs President Obama’s Global Development Council, has been forecasting the risk of a ‘perfect storm’, adding that considering ‘its destructive potential, it warrants serious attention by policymakers’, though China does not loom large in his list of contributing factors.

fifediet small family2

Mike Small (with family, above) is said to be ‘behind’ the Fife Diet local eating experiment, which aims to relocalise food production and distribution on a regional basis, as a response to globalisation and climate change. See a 2008 Telegraph article and more in depth on the Transition Culture website.

Remarkably, it is funded by the Scottish Government’s Climate Challenge Fund and has also received funding from Celebrating Fife, the Co-op Community Fund and Awards for All.

Over an eight year period the Fife Diet has developed from a simple idea framed around ‘local eating’ to a complex one about sustainable food, environmental justice, globalisation and culture. They set out to build a sustainable food movement that popularised eating healthy, local produce in Fife, starting from the understanding that there is something fundamentally wrong with the food system but also from the thought that they could, by acting collectively, do something about it.

They now believe that food has become central to the precarious economy. Real progress won’t be made until control is regained over the retail experience, and profiteers that benefit from products that fuel obesity are confronted.

In the Food Manifesto they are developing, they call for opportunities for the ‘right to grow’ and an expectation of quality healthy food in our public institutions, aiming eventually to become – as the Scottish government puts it, a ‘Good Food Nation’.

FAQ: “But what fruit do you eat?” Fife’s Pittormie fruit farm produce:

fife's pittormirefruitboxjuly091

Remarkable achievements listed on their site:

CELEBRATING OUR OWN FOOD CULTURE

When we started we were met by a mixture of incredulity and poorly-disguised scepticism. People really didn’t think that you could eat food from Fife, and survive at all. It was just unthinkable, unimaginable.

CARBON SAVINGS

In 2011-2012 we saved 1019 tonnes of C02e. Then, in a three year period (April 2012- March 2015) we saved a further 6976.37 tonnes of C02e. These are immediate savings, by diverting food waste from landfill thereby avoiding creating methane, for example, or by sequestering carbon and enriching soil with compost, but also by eating locally, growing our own food, eating organic, changing the meat we ate (and eating less of it).

OUTREACH

We held or attended over 500 outreach events over the three years, engaging with 15,520 people.

GROWING SPACES

We established a community food growing garden, a wildlife and forest garden and a vibrant volunteer and community group who are maintaining them. We hosted 57 events at the garden, including the children’s gardening club, large community lunches and volunteer sessions.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

We ran 79 weekly children’s gardening clubs (79 clubs over three years) and hosted 7 large-scale community events.

LEADING THE WAY

We were part of building a new food movement in Scotland that encompasses the right to food, championing small producers, insisting on sustainability as a measurement of quality in food production and celebrating food sovereignty.

NEW ORCHARDS

We planted 7 orchards around Scotland from Galloway to Sutherland with our Silver Bough tour (‘ a cultural conversation about apples’).

SCHOOL LUNCHES PILOT

We collaborated with Fife Council and the Soil Association in a pilot project exploring regionally sourced, healthy, sustainable and organic school lunches. See here.

INSPIRATIONAL PRINTED MATERIAL

We published a series of inspiring posters, postcards, booklets and other materials including recipe books, calendars, guides on native apple varieties and a booklet on gardening with kids. We also produced a free Ebook for our members of Collected Recipes from the life of the project.

BIRTHING THE ORCHARD COLLECTIVE

We curated and hosted the National Orchard gathering and helping the Orchard Collective into existence.

THE BIGGER PICTURE

We are proud to have been part of a wider movement and welcomed the collaborative work over the past eight years with such groups as Nourish, the Soil Association, Slow Food, Permaculture Scotland and Transition Towns.

Much more here: http://fifediet.co.uk/fife-diet-chronology/

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End note: protect and rediversify local economies

pp hines logoAs LWM’s co-founder, Colin Hines, has written, there is growing opposition to a system which regards as inevitable the driving down of tax rates for higher income earners, worsens social and environmental conditions and kills local jobs and small business opportunities:

“Whistling in the dark to keep up the nation’s economic spirits by promising export-led growth in an era of rising Asian dominance is a ridiculous policy. The alternative to these dangerous and damaging dark alleys is to propose a set of practical measures for protecting and rediversifyng local economies. This is the only way to tackle the economic and environmental crises, return local control of the economy to citizens and provide a sense of hope for their future . . .”

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Event: Guild of Independent Currencies: June Meetup

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Date: 15th June 2015
Time: 9:30am to 5pm
Where: Exeter Quaker Meeting House. Wynards Lane EX2 4HU
Cost: £5 includes lunch and refreshments

The Guild of Independent Currencies has been created by the Bristol Pound (covered on sister site in 2013) to help others to launch their own independent currencies, supporting them through shared technology, best practice and with anything else they may need. Read more here: http://guildofindependentcurrencies.org/

bristol pound

(Covered on sister site in 2013) Bristol Pound director Chris Sunderland explains that “Most of the money spent in a city, leaves almost as soon as it’s spent. It goes up to the financial institutions and gets lost. What people can be sure of with Bristol Pounds is that they’re circulating in the city and that’s where they’ll stay.”

Around 650,000 Bristol Pounds are in circulation and more than 750 local businesses use the scheme. Inspired by Bristol Pound’s success, locations including Cardiff, Bath and Kingston are considering starting their own scheme. Local currencies also exist in Totnes, Stroud, Lewes and Brixton.

If you are interested in local currencies, thinking of setting one up in your local area or currently engaged in trying to make one work, then Exeter is the place to be at the moment. This September they will launch their own currency and preparations are in full swing, come and meet the team at our June Meet Up and find out how they are getting on.

Agenda (Draft)

We’re packing it in for a fun and informative day! All the information and help you need for your local scheme plus swap tips and stories about how you are making it happen.

9:30 Arrive, Coffee, Mingle
10:00 Welcome to conference from Exeter Pound, practical info
10:10 Keynote Chris Sunderland, Founder Director Bristol Pound CIC
10:30 Introductions and updates from currency schemes attending
11:00 Workshop: Community and trader engagement
11:30 Tea Break
12:00 Workshop: Institutional Engagement and Procurement
12:30 Workshop: Legal and Regulatory Issues, including Credit Union involvement
13:00 Lunch provided by Real Food Cooperative
14:00 Printed Currencies Presentation Brian Kenworthy, Orion Security Print
14:30 Workshop: Technical Developments
15:00 Open Space Discussions – topics to be decided throughout the day
16:30 Guild of Independent Currencies – Next steps
17:00 Close

Limited places available so don’t miss out by booking now!

Booking: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/meetup-june-2015-tickets-16875566273

 

A localising message from former MP Andrew George and journalist George Monbiot

andrew georgeFormer MP Andrew George sent an email message today; though no longer in Parliament, he wants to work with colleagues of all parties to create a progressive alliance to challenge and oppose government action detrimental to those who need help, our communities, our public services, the NHS and the environment.

He added that the Conservatives – with less than 25% of the electorate having voted for them – are now entitled to govern this country . . . They may have a parliamentary mandate, but they don’t have a moral justification to rule as they please”.

The next message in the inbox was from George Monbiot who took up the narrative and described the process:

George Monbiot 3He asserts that “No progressive party can survive the corporate press, corrupt party funding systems and conservative fear machines by fighting these forces on their own terms”. His prescription:

“The left can build only from the ground up; reshaping itself through the revitalisation of communities, working with local people to help fill the gaps in social provision left by an uncaring elite. Successful progressive movements must now be citizen’s advice bureau, housing association, scout troop, trade union, credit union, bingo hall, food bank, careworker, football club and evangelical church, rolled into one. Focus groups and spin doctors no longer deliver . . .

“In Brazil, Bolivia, Argentina, Ecuador, Venezuela, Uruguay and Chile, such movements transformed political life. They have evicted governments opposed to their interests and held to account those who claim to represent them. Syriza in Greece and Podemos in Spain have been inspired, directly or indirectly, by the Latin American experience”.

Monbiot referred to Ed Miliband’s Movement for Change (read more here), which has “lobbied job centres to stop treating applicants like criminals; pressed local businesses to advertise their jobs openly; urged the police to change the way they engage with victims of domestic abuse; chivvied councils to clear up discarded needles; struggled against revenge evictions; asked local media to stop running advertisements for loan sharks and sought to provide alternative finance; and appealed to the owners of derelict buildings to rehabilitate them, all with a degree of success”.

He warns that rebuilding community has to start almost from scratch and might take decades because in Britain community life is weaker than almost anywhere else.

The timeline:

  • destruction of rural populations through enclosure and agricultural change, rapid and chaotic urbanisation based around industries that later collapsed,
  • the implosion of organised labour,
  • extreme atomisation and hyper-consumerism

But until it happens, there’s little hope for lasting progressive change in this country.

Monbiot ends: “Revitalising communities is not just an election strategy. It is a programme for change in its own right; even without a sympathetic government. If it takes root, it will outlast the vicissitudes of politics. But it will also make success more likely. If Labour wants to reconnect, it must be the change it wants to see”.

America: six big shifts towards an economy that distributes economic benefits widely and minimizes damage to the environment

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sarah van gelderSarah van Gelder (right) is co-founder and executive editor of YES! Magazine which feature powerful ideas and practical actions towards a more just and sustainable world. She has co-founded a cohousing community, organized tenants and built a produce cooperative, providing local, sustainably grown whole foods, at affordable prices, to residents who want local, sustainable food sourced within walking distance of their homes.

Sarah points out that, in America as in Britain, corporations and the wealthy are recovering well after the collapse of the global economy in 2008. This is confirmed by Nomi Prins, (left, a senior fellow at America’s Demos) who has worked as a managing director at Goldman-Sachs, a Senior Managing Director at Bear Stearns and senior strategist at Lehman Brothers.

nomi prinsShe records that corporate profits have jumped back to near-historical highs, and banks are hoarding an extra $1 trillion in reserve at the Fed. However, Ms Prins points out that over 90% of the population have “an overhang of debt, stagnant wages and inferior jobs, all exacerbating income inequality”.

Sarah asserts that many people are losing patience with the corporate economy—and turning to initiatives that build a new economy. Grassroots groups, local entrepreneurs and broad-based coalitions are building the foundations of an economy that distributes economic benefits widely and minimizes damage to the environment. She lists six big shifts (the links are very well worth following):

  1. Local food, once a tiny niche market, has gone mainstream. The growing, processing, and marketing of local foods is booming in many areas, including the eastern U.S., abandoned neighborhoods in Detroit, Michigan and towns and cities throughout the country. Via farmers markets and direct purchases from growers, the food travels quickly from farm to table, keeping it fresh and nutritious. Local food isn’t always greener, but a local diet does reduce emissions from food transportation, support local jobs, and connect people to their neighbors and local environment.
  1. More workers own their jobs. Worker-owned co-ops have been spreading, particularly since the recession. While they, like all businesses, can struggle, they also can help keep good jobs stable and keep money in the community. In the Bronx in New York City, the 2,300 employees who work at Cooperative Home Health Care Associates get better pay, more job security, and more training for career advancement than their counterparts at competing firms. In Chicago, workers at a manufacturing plant who were laid off when the plant was shut down bought out the factory and now operate it as New Era Window and Doors. The most famous example of worker ownership, however, is in the Basque region of Spain, which has more than 70,000 worker-owners in more than 200 enterprises. Labor unions and community activists in the United States are beginning to emulate the success of Spain’s Mondragon Cooperatives, especially in hard-hit rust belt regions.

karma kitchen

  1. The economy goes DIY. Making, DIY, and sharing culture: ethic of reuse and no waste, a bias for local and small-scale, and a preference for generosity is blossoming. Young people especially are building tiny houses and writing open source software. Online platforms like Couchsurfing let people share their homes with travelers. Others have started “pay-it-forward” restaurants where you pay not for your own meal, but for the person behind you in the line.
  1. Money grows more responsible. Campaigners in 22 states aim to open government-owned banks at the state, county or municipal level to finance local economies and keep profits nearby. The latest trend, in light of the threat of climate disruption, is to divest from holdings in coal, oil, and gas companies. To date, more than 800 global investors have pledged to divest over $50 billion. Redirecting assets from big corporations and Wall Street to sustainable local enterprises is providing investment capital needed to fuel the new economy.
  1. clt berkshiresSome homes stay affordable. A small percentage of people are living in community land trust homes – affordable by design – and foreclosure rates were one-tenth of the national level. This success is causing cities and advocates for the poor elsewhere to look at this as a model of permanently affordable housing. Keeping basic necessities, like our homes, out of the speculative market helps stabilize the economy and averts the disruption and impoverishment that results from predatory real estate and lending practices.
  1. Innovation emerges to protect our resources. The new economy draws on the wealth of common assets, including fresh water, the Internet, green spaces in our cities, and the storehouse of knowledge we inherit from previous generations.

It does so in a way that neither depletes them nor excludes others. That means protecting water quality, keeping the Internet open, protecting the stability of the climate, and ensuring access to a good education—for ourselves and for those not yet born.

The new economy is being built on grassroots-led, pragmatic actions that people around the U.S. and around the world are taking to create widely shared, sustainable prosperity.

Read Sarah’s article here: http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/six-ways-the-us-is-building-a-people-powered-economy