Update: International Alliance for Localisation

Early in December this blog reported that Local Futures has gathered a cross-cultural, North-South network of thinkers, activists and NGOs – the International Alliance for Localization (IAL). It already has members from over 30 countries and Localise West Midlands is one of the member organisations.

isec report coverIn the wake of the Paris climate talks, Local Futures has released a 16 page action paper entitled Climate Change or System Change? (left).

It argues that globalization – the deregulation of trade and finance through an ongoing series of “free trade” treaties – is the driving force behind climate change.

The climate problem can only be tackled effectively if governments stop subsidising globalisation, and begin pursuing a localisation agenda instead.

A recording of Local Futures’ first webinar, with community economist Michael Shuman and Helena Norberg is now uploaded on YouTube.

Climate Change or System Change? will be the focus of the second international webinar in January, as part of the Global to Local webinar series. More information will follow soon.

Contact via http://www.localfutures.org/contact-us/

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See in more detail: https://britain2020.wordpress.com/2016/01/03/localisation-a-systemic-solution-multiplier-simultaneously-lowering-co2-emissions-restoring-democracy-and-providing-secure-livelihoods-part-1/

Brief extracts from the 16 page action paper entitled Climate Change or System Change? – may be seen here: https://britain2020.wordpress.com/localisation-systemic-solution-multiplier-part-2/

 

International Alliance for Localization

ial logo

The International Alliance for Localization (IAL) is a new cross-cultural network of groups and individuals focused on resistance, renewal, and radically new visions of development and progress.

In less than two months, individuals from 28 different countries have joined. These include farmers, teachers, builders, community organizers, environmental stewards, peace activists, homesteaders, students, health workers, business consultants, writers, engineers, artists, radio producers, researchers, and more.

Many organizations have also signed up: groups focused on social justice, ecological restoration, spiritual values, sustainable food and farming, holistic education, and policy research and advocacy. (Below, farmers’ markets were pioneered in Britain and elsewhere by ISEC, which promotes locally based alternatives to the global consumer culture by writing, filming and practical action.)

farmers market - scandinavian or

Among these are:

Swadeshi Jagaran Manch (India);

Digo Bikas Institute (Nepal);

Localize West Midlands (UK);

The Sustainability Institute and Greyton Transition Town (South Africa);

Noakhali Rural Development Society (Bangladesh);

Centre for Global Justice (Mexico/USA);

Gaia Education (UK);

Holy Cross International Justice Office (USA);

Small Farm Training Center (USA), and many more.

This broad-based interest in the IAL shows that people worldwide are beginning to recognize that localization is a viable strategy for positive change on a global level.

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Local development as a strategic alternative in Fife

Once again many will question the dependence on a global market economy as headlines shout, “China’s ‘Black Monday’ sends markets reeling”. For months, in a range of publications, Mohamed El-Erian, who chairs President Obama’s Global Development Council, has been forecasting the risk of a ‘perfect storm’, adding that considering ‘its destructive potential, it warrants serious attention by policymakers’, though China does not loom large in his list of contributing factors.

fifediet small family2

Mike Small (with family, above) is said to be ‘behind’ the Fife Diet local eating experiment, which aims to relocalise food production and distribution on a regional basis, as a response to globalisation and climate change. See a 2008 Telegraph article and more in depth on the Transition Culture website.

Remarkably, it is funded by the Scottish Government’s Climate Challenge Fund and has also received funding from Celebrating Fife, the Co-op Community Fund and Awards for All.

Over an eight year period the Fife Diet has developed from a simple idea framed around ‘local eating’ to a complex one about sustainable food, environmental justice, globalisation and culture. They set out to build a sustainable food movement that popularised eating healthy, local produce in Fife, starting from the understanding that there is something fundamentally wrong with the food system but also from the thought that they could, by acting collectively, do something about it.

They now believe that food has become central to the precarious economy. Real progress won’t be made until control is regained over the retail experience, and profiteers that benefit from products that fuel obesity are confronted.

In the Food Manifesto they are developing, they call for opportunities for the ‘right to grow’ and an expectation of quality healthy food in our public institutions, aiming eventually to become – as the Scottish government puts it, a ‘Good Food Nation’.

FAQ: “But what fruit do you eat?” Fife’s Pittormie fruit farm produce:

fife's pittormirefruitboxjuly091

Remarkable achievements listed on their site:

CELEBRATING OUR OWN FOOD CULTURE

When we started we were met by a mixture of incredulity and poorly-disguised scepticism. People really didn’t think that you could eat food from Fife, and survive at all. It was just unthinkable, unimaginable.

CARBON SAVINGS

In 2011-2012 we saved 1019 tonnes of C02e. Then, in a three year period (April 2012- March 2015) we saved a further 6976.37 tonnes of C02e. These are immediate savings, by diverting food waste from landfill thereby avoiding creating methane, for example, or by sequestering carbon and enriching soil with compost, but also by eating locally, growing our own food, eating organic, changing the meat we ate (and eating less of it).

OUTREACH

We held or attended over 500 outreach events over the three years, engaging with 15,520 people.

GROWING SPACES

We established a community food growing garden, a wildlife and forest garden and a vibrant volunteer and community group who are maintaining them. We hosted 57 events at the garden, including the children’s gardening club, large community lunches and volunteer sessions.

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

We ran 79 weekly children’s gardening clubs (79 clubs over three years) and hosted 7 large-scale community events.

LEADING THE WAY

We were part of building a new food movement in Scotland that encompasses the right to food, championing small producers, insisting on sustainability as a measurement of quality in food production and celebrating food sovereignty.

NEW ORCHARDS

We planted 7 orchards around Scotland from Galloway to Sutherland with our Silver Bough tour (‘ a cultural conversation about apples’).

SCHOOL LUNCHES PILOT

We collaborated with Fife Council and the Soil Association in a pilot project exploring regionally sourced, healthy, sustainable and organic school lunches. See here.

INSPIRATIONAL PRINTED MATERIAL

We published a series of inspiring posters, postcards, booklets and other materials including recipe books, calendars, guides on native apple varieties and a booklet on gardening with kids. We also produced a free Ebook for our members of Collected Recipes from the life of the project.

BIRTHING THE ORCHARD COLLECTIVE

We curated and hosted the National Orchard gathering and helping the Orchard Collective into existence.

THE BIGGER PICTURE

We are proud to have been part of a wider movement and welcomed the collaborative work over the past eight years with such groups as Nourish, the Soil Association, Slow Food, Permaculture Scotland and Transition Towns.

Much more here: http://fifediet.co.uk/fife-diet-chronology/

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End note: protect and rediversify local economies

pp hines logoAs LWM’s co-founder, Colin Hines, has written, there is growing opposition to a system which regards as inevitable the driving down of tax rates for higher income earners, worsens social and environmental conditions and kills local jobs and small business opportunities:

“Whistling in the dark to keep up the nation’s economic spirits by promising export-led growth in an era of rising Asian dominance is a ridiculous policy. The alternative to these dangerous and damaging dark alleys is to propose a set of practical measures for protecting and rediversifyng local economies. This is the only way to tackle the economic and environmental crises, return local control of the economy to citizens and provide a sense of hope for their future . . .”

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Is a quiet political revolution getting under way?

As the old order with its class and gender hierarchies gave way, George Monbiot points out that the void filled with junk could have been occupied by a better society, built on mutual support and connectedness, without the stifling stratification of the old order.

The feast to which we were invited is only for the few’

foe logoInstead, as the developed world – saturated with advertising, the handmaiden of market fundamentalism – became reliant on rising consumption to avert economic collapse, he notes that Friends of the Earth has begun to explore how we might reconnect with each other and with the natural world. New models for urban living are based on sharing rather than competitive consumption:

  • the sharing of cars and appliances and tools,
  • of money (through credit unions and micro-finance) and power.
  • community-led decision-making, over transport, planning and, perhaps, rent levels, minimum and maximum wages,
  • municipal budgets and taxation.

Such initiatives, facilitated by the state can bring people together with a sense of shared purpose, ownership and mutual support that centralised decision-making can never provide. But in some areas, non-party political movements are achieving this without that elusive government facilitation

Independents

Peter Macfadyen, Kate Bielby and Mel Usher of Independents for Frome
Peter Macfadyen, Kate Bielby and Mel Usher of Independents for Frome

Today, a neighbour gave the writer a cutting about Frome’s declaration of independence.

This Somerset market town has developed “flatpack democracy”, taking political power at a local level and enabling people to have a greater say in the decisions that affect their lives.”

Independents for Frome took all 17 seats on Frome’s town council, with vote-shares as high as 70%, and support from people who cast their other votes for the main political parties.  

Localism in action

Though local Conservatives were convinced that austerity had to apply even at the most local level, the council has borrowed around £750,000 to invest in buildings and land:

  • green spaces have been spruced up
  • game-changing help has been given to the local credit union
  • he council is involved in a new renewable energy cooperative,
  • and has put money into the setting up of a new “share shop”

In Devon the Buckfastleigh Independents group have followed a similar path. the town’s new deputy mayor, Pam Barrett says the town is ”a working-class town that’s been suffering from a real loss of services.” After fighting – successfully – to keep open a library and swimming pool, she and other residents stood for town council seats that had not been contested for “20 or more years”. One of the catalysts, she says, was a box of 10 copies of the Flatpack Democracy booklet, which was brought in by one of her colleagues. On 7 May, they also took nine of 12 seats, and started running the show.

Flatpack Democracy ideas are being shared with other groups in Devon and Somerset and though people in Alderley Edge, Cheshire were not aware of developments in the West Country, their thinking is much the same: as one newly elected councillor, Mike Dudley-Jones, said: “our basic mantra is that there is no place for mainstream party politics at this level”.

On election day, Conservatives lost all nine of the parish council’s seats to this group – Alderley Edge First – which also took the village’s one seat on Cheshire East council.

Co-operatives: raising and developing the weakest part of our local communities and civil society?

The roots of the co-operative movement in Italy go back to 19th century workers’ associations, with credit services, agricultural and building co-ops forming an important part of the overall economy. There are more than 20, 000 cooperatives, including housing and banking movements, with over 3 million members.

In 2011 Jeffrey Hollander asserted that the success of worker cooperative models in Italy and Spain presents US & UK with a compelling model for building a new, sustainable economy: 

italian co-ops text pics

An alternative to the “throw-away culture created by the powers that control the economic and financial policies of the globalized world”

Reuters reports that Pope Francis, speaking to members of the Confederation of Italian Co-operatives, condemned economic systems that “suffocate hope” and a globalised culture that treated its employees as disposable. New models and methods are needed that offer an alternative to the “throw-away culture created by the powers that control the economic and financial policies of the globalized world.”

He adds:

“Co-operatives should continue to be the motor that raises and develops the weakest part of our local communities and civil society”

The Pope said that the establishment of more co-operatives could help to solve crises of unemployment among young people and offer women jobs with a work-life balance that enabled them to care for their families.

Finally he called for money to be ‘at the service of life, managed in the right way by real co-operatives where capital does not command men but men command capital.

LWM co-founder: rebuild and rediversify economies

euro memo group header

Last September, Colin Hines, co-founder of LWM, gave the final address (link to pdf here) at the 20th Conference on Alternative Economic Policy in Europe, at the Sapienza University in Rome (Department of Statistics), organised by the EuroMemo Group and jointly hosted with Economia Civile. His conclusion:

“A successful campaign to turn Treaty of Rome into a “treaty of home” would allow countries to cooperate to take back control of their borders for progressive goals, such as reducing inequality and rebuilding flourishing, sustainable local economies. This in turn could result in increased political support for a reformed Europe which actually gives citizens hope by providing economic, social and environmental policies which tackle the majority’s present fears for the future, rather than making them worse”.

Human-scale, decentralised technologies

small is beautiful latest edition coverIn Lean Logic, the late David Fleming recalls that in in 1995, the Times Literary Supplement placed a book by E.F. Schumacher, the chief economic advisor to the UK Coal Board for two post war decades, among the 100 most influential books published since World War II. Small Is Beautiful: a study of economics as if people mattered has been translated into many languages.

This internationally influential economic thinker, statistician and economist, who advocated human-scale, decentralised and appropriate technologies, would have heartily agreed with Karen Leach’s observation that the global drive for the mega and mega-complex solution is part of the centralisation drive – where decision-makers can’t see the collective potential of small scale technology, now often called ‘appropriate technology’ (AT).

Fleming records that Schumacher deplored the “countless ‘experts’ who cannot conceive the possibility of any industrial production unless all the paraphernalia of the Western way of life are provided in advance. The ‘basis of everything’, they say, is of course electricity, steel, cement, near-perfect organisation, sophisticated accountancy. . . In blind pursuit of [a] highly questionable utopia, these ‘experts’ tend to neglect everything that is realistically possible“.

 Locally designed using local materials

AT is designed to fit the circumstances of the people who are to use it; people who need a solution which is cheap to build, small-scale, made from local materials, easy to operate, simple to maintain and energy-efficient is often. It does not start a sequence of pollution, with clean-up commitments, repairs and costs extending into the future. We suggest example:

  • micro-hydro turbines, long-lasting and low-maintenance provide enough power for a number of houses or a small community. The nearest example is probably the Beeston Weir project in the East Midlands. Practical Action can offer far cheaper turbines than commercial products in this country;
  • off-grid living can include solar which generates electricity for immediate use, with no grid connection; solar panels convert sunlight to energy which charges the battery built into lights, computers and refrigerators;
  • there are several reed beds in the region used for the water treatment of a single house or a small neighbourhood – water is cleaned by micro-organisms living on the root system; probably the nearest small-scale example is at Ryton Organic Garden near Coventry.
  • straw-bale construction, probably the nearest regional example is the next door neighbour of Dragon Orchard in Herefordshire;
  • see also the simple-to-build, cost-effective low environmental impact office in Moseley.

LWM’s Mission statement

Localise West Midlands is a not-for-profit organisation which exists to promote the environmental, social and economic benefits of:

  • Local trading, using local businesses, materials and supply chains
  • Linking local needs to local resources
  • Development of community and local capacity
  • Decentralisation of appropriate democratic and economic power
  • Provision of services tailored to meet local needs.

This localisation approach makes economic development and government systems more sensitive to local autonomy, culture, wellbeing and the responsible use of finite resources, and is growing in popularity with people and organisations all over the world.

For more information about some of these technologies, contact the Renewable Energy Centre in Kenilworth. See also Localise West Midlands Scoping Study: Decentralised Energy for Birmingham (pdf)

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A lesson for Britain: Brazil promotes food security and local food procurement, strengthening family farming

graziano da silvaVested interests replacing the now defunct Flying Matters, a lobby group funded by the aviation industry, vigorously defend the profitable import of food from countries with malnourished people. A better way forward, socially, economically and environmentally is offered by the Director General of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, Jose Graziano da Silva (Extraordinary Minister for Food Security), one of the champions of the Zero Hunger project in Brazil, which raised 28 million people above the poverty line during the 8 years of the Lula administration.

Small-scale family farmers, who accounted for a significant percentage of the agriculture/livestock production in Brazil particularly of staple food items, were usually excluded from agricultural policy discussions. They mobilised and a national program, the Pronaf, was created in 1995, offering the first credit line specifically designed for family farming in Brazil.

Local food procurement, a success in Brazil today

school meal brazilA School Meal Law (Pnae) was passed, requiring 30% of the public food purchases for school meals to be made locally from family farmers. It strengthened local and regional markets, fostered the circulation of profits in the region, recovered regional food habits and promoted the establishment of associations or cooperatives, which play an instrumental role in organizing food production and protecting the economy of the poorest sectors of the population.

Da Silva commented: “This ensures stable markets for farmers and at the same time ensures culturally-acceptable, nutritious and fresh meals for school-going children.

zero hunger coverA Family Agriculture Food Acquisition Program was set up and generates income for poor family farmers (household income not exceeding R$ 110,000) by selling their surplus food produce to the federal government and encouraging the creation or development of marketing channels for family farming products. It also provided a price guarantee tool for part of their produce.

A range of initiatives, included crop insurance and special credit lines were created for young people, women, organic crops, working capital and shares in cooperatives, agroindustrial projects, rural tourism, environmental recovery and semiarid regions.

The farmers’ organizations financed and set up stocks of products of the current harvest, strengthening food security systems and keeping food products in their localities, allowing any surplus to be sold when prices are more rewarding for farmers. Read more here and in the book (right) co-authored by Dr da Silva.

Several countries in Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa are adopting similar approaches.

modi da silva agric

 Dr. Jose Graziano da Silva recently met India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi and discussed India’s National Food Security Mission. Both agreed that food security comes first and national governments must have the flexibility to put in place suitable mechanisms to achieve it. Modi sought the FAO’s cooperation in designing a campaign for women which would highlight ways to improve families’ nutritional value and food habits. They discussed ways of linking family farming production to school meal programmes by creating local food procurement programmes and increasing the nutritional value of the mid-day meal scheme for school children.

Meanwhile, British farmers are encouraged by their unions and government agencies to produce more food for export, though prices then inevitably fall as supply rises, and the global market consistently rewards only the speculator or the unproductive middleman.

Think global, act local – H.T. Brigham, Coleshill

htbrigham

Where did you buy your groceries from this week? Did you visit the independent traders on your local high street, or the one-stop-shop supermarket just down the road?

Which you choose will probably come down to several factors including, price, quality, variety, convenience, and not least, whether you even have a local high street anymore.

We are often told about the benefits of sourcing locally for the local economy, the environment and for ourselves. In reality, we probably end up striking a balance between the two, in order to get the variety of goods we need, at the price that we want to pay, whilst still sourcing more specialist items from local suppliers . . .

This is certainly true for HT Brigham. In fact, even though HTB supplies metal components on a global scale, the emphasis on sourcing locally is probably more prominent than you may expect.

And why not? The benefits of having a localised supply chain can be considerable and with over 70 % of HTB’s suppliers based in the West Midlands area, we are taking full advantage of the skill base which is right on our doorstep.

One major benefit for businesses who decide to source locally is undeniably in the area of logistics. At a time when the trend for OEM’s sourcing from the Far East appears to be reversing, it is obvious that there is more on the purchasing wish list than just cost:

  • In business, time can often be in short supply, making supplier response crucial. The focus on time to market, quick turnarounds and short lead-times is extremely prominent. A local company which will take less time to deliver the goods required, at a lower logistical cost than a company which is further away, may well have the edge.
  • On top of shorter lead-times and lower delivery costs, our local suppliers can often provide a more responsive service too. Their locality means that they can be more reactive to our changing demands and any urgent requirements which we may have.
  • They are also able to be more flexible with batch sizes and delivery schedules, as well as being able to act responsively to rectify any issues, should they occur.
  • In addition, the relationships which form between companies within a close knit supply network can be extremely valuable. With simple chains of communication, personal contact and simply being near by, local suppliers can often work closely with customers, providing a level of support which can make all the difference.

On occasion, there may be reason for some degree of caution. It may be convenient and comfortable to choose a supplier based just down the road or which you have used for forever and a day, but what if that supplier is not competitive on price or quality? We cannot allow our local suppliers to become complacent. Keep them on their toes with regular benchmark exercises.

made in the midlands header

HT Brigham is a founding member of the Made in the Midlands initiative, a business network representing approximately 250 manufacturing SMEs in the Midlands area. The group acts as a platform for firms to source and supply with each other, and collaborate in order to improve their businesses. HT Brigham is actively practicing this ethos, having recently embarked on a significant expansion programme, to accommodate an increase in workload from the USA.

With work being awarded to Midlands based architects and contractors to complete this expansion, the knock on effect from this increase in revenue from overseas, will filter through to the local economy, with the benefits being kept in the Midlands.

 

 

Read in full: http://www.htbrigham.co.uk/blog/2014/01/think-global-act-local/

Globalisation – the open trading system – is fragmenting

Philip Stephens, an associate editor, in the Financial Times: Globalisation – the open trading system – is fragmenting; it needs an enforcer – a hegemon, a concert of powers or global governance arrangements”.

Evidence: the collapse of the Doha, the demise of global free-trade agreements, and the emergence of regional coalitions and deals. The emerging economies are building south-south relationships and the Brics nations are setting up their own financial institutions.

Colin Hines, co-founder of LWM goes further – and deeper. He advocates the rebuilding and rediversifying of economies by limiting the entry of finance, goods and people from other countries, ensuring local provision of goods, finance and services and weaning themselves off export dependence. Depending on the context, ‘local’ goods would come from the nearest source, the region, the nation state or even a regional grouping of nation states – eg oranges from EU/Spain.

Domestic businesses and funding sources would then meet the needs of the majority in society in all countries. The prospect of such increasing economic security for the majority could gain widespread political support ranging from those on the left, the centre and the greens through to small ‘c’ conservatives.

In 2008, just before the economic collapse, as GND convenor, he presented a mechanism which would have enabled the Green New Deal to prosper. ‘Green Quantitative Easing’ would have made every building in the country energy efficient, and built hundreds of thousands of new, affordable and energy-efficient homes. A massive boost would have been given to economic activity, providing jobs on a living wage in every community in the UK, whilst reducing its environmental impact.

Later this month he will be speaking in Italy at a conference of left economists to float the progressive protectionism agenda and criticise the left, centre and greens for their support of open borders, leaving the extreme right in an ever more powerful position.