Corbyn focusses on decentralisation: localising energy and transport

corbyn-eee-manifestoJeremy Corbyn has launched an environmental manifesto that outlines plans for the UK to achieve 65% of energy from renewable sources by 2030 – without fracking.

Corbyn proposes to put cities, councils, devolved governments and communities at the heart of an efficient, decentralised energy system by promoting a shift to electric and hydrogen buses and cars; a network of low-emission zones and cycling with safe cycle lanes and hire schemes in every town and city.

The manifesto places social enterprises, including not-for-profits and co-ops at the heart of Corbyn’s plans for a “publicly run, locally accountable energy system”.

A “publicly run, locally accountable energy system”.

In a speech in Nottingham, the Labour leader said, “We want Britain to be the world’s leading producer of renewable technology. To achieve this, we will accelerate the transition to a low-carbon economy, and drive the expansion of the green industries and jobs of the future, using our National Investment Bank to invest in public and community-owned renewable energy. This will deliver clean energy and curb energy bill rises for households; an energy policy for the 60 million, not the Big 6 energy companies.”

He has promised to promote over a thousand local energy companies in the next parliament and legislate to give community energy co-operatives the right to sell energy directly to the communities they serve.

Housing

It would launch a National Home Insulation plan to insulate at least 4 million homes and phase out coal-fired power by 2025. The Labour leader estimates over 300,000 jobs would be created in the renewables sector as a result of these measures.

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Labour would reinstate the department for energy and climate change in its first month of going back into government, as part of its plan to rebuild and transform Britain, “so that no-one and no community is left behind,” he said at the event in Nottingham.

Jeremy Corbyn also encourages the British public to take action as individuals to help to meet the Paris climate agreement. He proposes to use the precautionary principle to protect the environment and people from harm – not a pay-to-pollute approach allowing the richest corporations and individuals to wreck our planet.

 

 

 

Update 2: International Alliance for Localisation

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In December this blog reported that Local Futures has gathered a cross-cultural, North-South network of thinkers, activists and NGOs – the International Alliance for Localization (IAL). It already has members from over 30 countries and Localise West Midlands is one of the member organisations.

This new cross-cultural network of groups and individuals focusses on resistance, renewal, and radically new visions of development and progress.

The response has exceeded IAL’s most optimistic expectations. In less than two months, individuals from 28 different countries have joined. These include farmers, teachers, builders, community organizers, environmental stewards, peace activists, homesteaders, students, health workers, business consultants, writers, engineers, artists, radio producers, researchers, and more.

Many organizations have also signed up: groups focused on social justice, ecological restoration, spiritual values, sustainable food and farming, holistic education, and policy research and advocacy. Among these are:

Swadeshi Jagaran Manch (India);

Digo Bikas Institute (Nepal);

Localize West Midlands (UK);

The Sustainability Institute and

Greyton Transition Town (South Africa);

Noakhali Rural Development Society (Bangladesh);

Centre for Global Justice (Mexico/USA);

Gaia Education (UK);

Holy Cross International Justice Office (USA);

Small Farm Training Center (USA), and many more.

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This broad-based interest in the IAL shows that people worldwide are beginning to recognize that localization is a viable strategy for positive change on a global level.

Next: March 30th fourth webinar in the Global to Local Webinar Series: Debt and Speculation in the Global Economy, with Helena Norberg-Hodge and Charles Eisenstein

Sheffield and Balsall Heath: the real march of the makers

julian dobson2The observations of Julian Dobson (Living With Rats blogspot @juliandobson), strike a welcome and hopeful chord after reading the dismal question: “Will Chancellor Osborne cripple the ‘makers’?”

A search revealed JD’s substantial localist credentials – as director of Urban Pollinators, which helps to make sense of regeneration and the editorial director of New Start, the national magazine for regeneration practitioners. He is on the editorial board of the journal Local Economy and writes think tanks and publications such as the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, the Centre for Local Economic Strategies and Res Publica. He is helping to create Our Society, a social action network, and Revive Our Town Centres, a network for people involved in rethinking local high streets.

george osborne 2 smallerChancellor George Osborne closed his 2011 Budget speech by eloquently setting out his aspiration for “a Britain carried aloft by the march of the makers”. But recently he caused consternation by closing down the Business Growth Service, including the Manufacturing Advisory Service and the Growth Accelerator programme.

Julian observes that if there’s going to be a march of the makers, it is more likely to take the form of developments such as Portland Works in Sheffield, a stone’s throw from Sheffield United’s Bramall Lane ground, a development born of “a local determination to see Portland Works kept in use as a place for making”.

He relates that a community trust was formed when the previous owner wanted to cash in and convert the premises into flats: more than 500 people bought into a community share issue, reflecting the groundswell of support both for the works’ heritage and the trust’s vision of the future”.

portland works

Portland Works currently has 32 tenants with a wide spread of interest, including a knife maker, engraver, forge operator, several artists, a rug maker, a window maker, a distiller, bike-makers, woodturners, musicians and jewellers.

Though both are beset by the difficulties of maintaining an old building, a similar pattern can be seen in Birmingham (below, rear view) at The Old Print Works in Balsall Heath – first mentioned on this site in 2013 – where ‘makers’ work in low-cost spaces.

old print worksFollowing his account, Julian Dobson concludes:

“If there’s going to be a march of the makers, it is more likely to look like this than the kind of projects favoured by central government and its placemen in local enterprise partnerships, obsessed with projects that rejoice in titles like Catapult and Accelerator.

“It is likely to be a much slower march than the periodic stampedes of real estate and financial services speculators, too. But it has the potential to last far longer and to create more useful stuff in the process.

“And while there’s no doubt that the makers of Portland Works are having to rough it far more than government ministers and their acolytes might be used to, I’d hazard a guess that their work is both more creative and more fulfilling”.

Does Birmingham Love the Brum Pound?

News from the Birmingham Pound, thanks to a little group of dedicated people – and you can perhaps help us… We’ve been joined by two brilliant new members with real live time to commit to the project: Ridhi Kalaria and Matthew Rowe. Ridhi, founder of Ort Cafe, ran our event for Small Business Saturday which saw 90-odd percent of attendees support the idea, and has gone on to star in this excellent short video explaining the Birmingham Pound idea for our Love Brum application.

Love Brum is a membership-based funder: members put money into the pot, and then vote for their favourite projects. They like to fund things that make Birmingham a better place (an EVEN better place!) and like the Birmingham Pound, they are keen to reach all corners of the city. If you are a member, please have a look and consider voting for this! Consider joining anyway – it’s a great fundraising idea.

Matthew, previously of the Envirolution Network in Manchester, has now relocated to our much more exciting city. IbuprofenHe has produced a comprehensive and slightly mind-boggling spreadsheet of Birmingham Pound costings under different funding scenarios, which other members are now  scrutinising carefully…

Matthew and Ridhi have also produced us a Brum Pound website, Twitter profile and Facebook page, so please sign up, follow or like as is your preference!

And keep watching this space – plenty more progress to follow shortly.

Karen Leach

Joint coordinator

Localism: a rescue plan for British democracy

A notable omission from Localise West Midlands’ extensive range of articles about, or with references to localism, is a review of a book by Simon Jenkins: Big Bang Localism: a rescue plan for British democracy.

big bang localismIn this book he attributes the decline in British voter interest and participation to the over-centralisation of power in Whitehall, ‘one of the most centralised governments in the West’. As turnouts in elections are dwindling, he notes, many are turning to ad hoc pressure groups and direct action.

Centralisation has not worked well, Jenkins believes; levels of satisfaction with health care, education and policing are lower in Britain than almost anywhere in the developed world. He notes a change in public opinion which once, on the whole, believed that the British government works well and is now shifting to a belief that it needs improving, citing contemporary YouGov polls showing a rise in discontent with public services and health care

Twelve years later the need to heed Jenkins’ pre Corbyn message has never been greater as the established on the political left and right frantically attempt to discredit and unseat a democratically elected party leader.

He noted that Britain’s local councillors are outnumbered three-to-one by 60,000 unelected people serving on roughly 5,200 local quangos, managing various functions that may be local but are no longer under local democratic control. Examples include health service, housing, prisons, training and economic development.

Jenkins points out that, across Europe, countries have spent the past two decades refreshing their local democracy – even traditionally centralised countries like France have devolved. The USA operates the most decentralised system of government and in these countries, public services are delivered more locally than in Britain – and win greater public trust as a result.

He sets out a programme for a ‘democratic Big Bang’, to return power to the local level, including control over health, police and education services, to re-enfranchise the British people:

Counties and cities should run:

  • health services
  • secondary schools
  • policing
  • the prison and probation services
  • youth employment and training
  • planning.

Municipalities and parishes should run whatever gives a community its pride and visual character:

  • primary schools
  • old people’s homes
  • nurseries and day-care centres
  • clinics and surgeries
  • parks and sports centres.

Local services should mostly be funded by local taxation, which should be raised from a combination of:

  • residential property tax
  • business rates
  • local income tax.

Jenkins proposes that central government funding of local services should take the form of a block grant, determined by the Local Democracy Commissioner and paid to local authorities with no strings attached.

The “enemies of localism” are vested interests and the national media, but devolution in Scotland and Wales shows that people prefer decisions about local services to be made locally. Simon Jenkins recommends that the Big Bang should start with a “bonfire of central controls” and an end to targets and official league tables, adding “Big Bang Localism is the answer to the failure of Britain’s public services and the loss of faith in British democracy”.

Crickhowell’s tax plan: an example of ‘people power’ raising awareness of injustice and HMRC’s failures

crickhowell 3

Crickhowell has an independent high street with very few of the trading names which now dominate look-alike urban and suburban commercial centres. The town made news earlier this year after offering shares to residents at £50 each to buy their Grade II listed Corn Exchange pub from Punch Taverns to avoid it being used as a convenience store by one of the large retail chains.

The FT reports that the town’s traders, including a salmon smokery, local coffee shop, book shop, optician and bakery have now submitted tax plans to HMRC, using the offshore arrangements favoured by multinationals. They hope that their ‘tax rebellion’ will spread to other towns forcing the Government to tackle how Amazon, for example, paid £11.9 million tax last year on £5.3 billion of UK sales.

The details of the scheme are not in the public domain, but townspeople say it involves shifting intangible assets to the Isle of Man and setting up a trading arm in the Netherlands.

High street coffee shop owner Steve said: ‘I have always paid every penny of tax I owe, and I don’t object to that. What I object to is paying my full tax when my big name competitors are doing the damnedest to dodge theirs.’ Starbucks, for example, has paid £8.6million in UK corporation tax since it opened its first shop in London’s Kings Road in 1998, funnelling revenues/royalties out of the UK and into the Netherlands and Switzerland where they have been offered better tax deals.

Retailers are ‘trying to create a level playing field’ by changing the law

Jo Carthew, who runs Crickhowell’s Black Mountain Smokery told the Independent: “We do want to pay our taxes because we all use local schools and hospitals but we want a change of law so everyone pays their fair share”.

Samantha Devos of Number Eighteen café cites the example of Facebook, which paid less than £5000 in corporate tax last year, according to the government’s ‘tax gap’ report, and insists that spending cuts would not be needed if big companies paid their tax.Steve Askew, the local baker, says the traders never intended to put the tax plan into practice. Their goal is to embarrass big companies and the government. “Any right-thinking person accepts we have to pay taxes. What people can’t accept is the injustice,” he added.

Despite the findings of the government’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC) – massive staff redundancies and poor performance – HMRC has responded by pointing to its extra funding to crack down on multinational avoidance and this April’s introduction of the diverted profits tax, a new “Google tax” on multinationals moving profits out of the UK. It also publishes estimates of the difference between tax paid and the amount that should be paid. This attributes just £1bn of the £34bn gap to tax avoidance.

HMRC speaking with ‘forked tongue’? Is it actually in meltdown? See the Committee of Public Accounts’ report on Revenue and Customs (summary and pdf): “HMRC still failing UK taxpayers”.