Financial tools supporting the local economy: the world’s first crowd-funded fee free payment app

“There seems be a real appetite among consumers to buy from independent retailers and support community shopping”

droplet header

Those who have been expressing interest in Localise West Midlands’s involvement with a future Birmingham Pound will also read the Birmingham Press account of Birmingham’s Droplet a mobile app born in Birmingham promising a ‘customer loyalty revolution’.

droplet snapshot 1a brum

The Press reports: “Droplet, the brainchild of tech entrepreneurs Steffan Aquarone and Will Grant, has used £575,000 of Crowdfunding to take the world’s first fee free payment app into eight cities across the UK. More than 300 independent retailers across Cambridge, Edinburgh, Exeter, Glasgow, Leeds, Manchester and Norwich are now accepting transactions by using the simple mobile app . . . The first eight cities have been chosen due to their vibrant independent scenes and their willingness to embrace new idea. Local ambassadors, who are well known in the community, have been appointed in each location to work with merchants to introduce the technology and grow the Droplet brand organically. With user numbers now over 23,000, there are plans already in place to build on the initial rollout by targeting another ten cities in 2016.

Will Grant says: “Birmingham is still a critically important city for us. This is where the Droplet story all began and we have just strengthened our team here to include new ambassador Laura Patricia Jones. She will be charged with building on our existing merchant base of 35 retailers and growing our user numbers in the city.”

droplet snapshot 3 brum

Using Droplet is simple for the consumer, just tap ‘pay here’ when entering a registered outlet for the first time and the payment is taken directly from your chosen card – you’ll get a notification on your phone to show how much you’ve been charged and the reward stamps you’ve earned.


For further information, please visit www.dropletpay.com follow @dropletpay on twitter or watch the launch video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzG1cO1-jXA

The latest neighbourhood initiative: ShirleyTOPS

shirley tops header

ShirleyTOPS is a community focused web site designed to encourage Shirley residents to support local businesses. It promotes around 500 businesses that trade across the Shirley area, listing shops by category – with clubs, nurseries, doctors, schools and a range of organisations promoted as well as over 500 places to shop or relax and enjoy a drink or meal. There is also a useful section on units to let.

shirley tops graphic

Developed at no cost to Shirley businesses, or the council tax payer, the ShirleyTOPS web site is sponsored by The Solihull Green Party. The content has been made possible thanks to hundreds of hours of input by volunteers.

Councillor Howard Allen sends the link: http://www.shirleytops.co.uk/. He writes:

Shirley high street in particular has suffered recently as Parkgate, instead of bringing the promised high street ‘names’, competes with the high street by adding to the number of bargain and charity shops. The situation is not desperate but some quick action is needed to halt and reverse the decline. Hopefully, the ShirleyTOPS web site will help by encouraging residents to support the local economy and shop locally rather than travelling further afield.

If anyone wants a club or society advertised and it’s not already on ShirleyTOPS then please just let me know. There is a contact form on the website for all to use.

shirley banner

Shirley Greens will be regularly advertising the ShirleyTOPS website to the over 16,000 homes in Shirley asking residents to use local businesses wherever possible. The Shirley Greens will also be direct mailing everyone who moves to Shirley to both advise them of all the things on offer in the area and again asking them to support their local businesses.

We are very happy to advertise any promotional activity being undertaken by any Shirley business or community group. All they need to do is let us have the details and we will add them to the ShirleyTOPS web site.

Please spread the word and also let me know of any businesses or organisations you think I have missed.

===============================================
Cllr Howard Allen – Shirley West ward, Solihull MBC

Bristol Pound – Birmingham Pound?

In March LWM’s co-ordinator reported the local interest in the potential of a Birmingham Pound – the Birmingham Mail following up one tweet about a first-stage meeting of a few potentially interested people. News of an increasingly well-developed scheme in Bristol gives an insight into the role of a local currency.

bristol poundThe Financial Times reported recently that theBristol poundis beginning to take root and ‘count’ in the local economy.

There are now about 1,200 members with Bristol pound accounts. Around 900 businesses in the city accept the currency including:

  • the local bus company which accepts Bristol pounds;
  • the council which accepts the local currency for council tax;
  • Good Energy, which takes the local currency as means of payment;
  • Yurt Lush, a Mongolian themed restaurant, which this month became the first business to pay its electricity bill using Bristol Pounds;
  • the council which will give staff who opt for this, all or part of their salary in Bristol pounds; George Ferguson, the mayor, is paid in the currency.

The Bristol Pound was launched in 2012 to support local business and reduce the environmental impact of long supply chains. There are notes of £1, £5, £10 and £20 denominations and someone opening an account with the Bristol Credit Union deposits sterling and is credited with an equal number of Bristol pounds. This money can be cashed, or drawn on electronically to pay bills online or via a mobile phone.

A case history from the FT:

bristol pound case history

The organisers say because the credit union is regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority, Bristol pound deposits will enjoy the same protection as an ordinary bank account.


Read the article here – free registration: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/4fe13c82-31e8-11e5-91ac-a5e17d9b4cff.html

 

Co-operatives: raising and developing the weakest part of our local communities and civil society?

The roots of the co-operative movement in Italy go back to 19th century workers’ associations, with credit services, agricultural and building co-ops forming an important part of the overall economy. There are more than 20, 000 cooperatives, including housing and banking movements, with over 3 million members.

In 2011 Jeffrey Hollander asserted that the success of worker cooperative models in Italy and Spain presents US & UK with a compelling model for building a new, sustainable economy: 

italian co-ops text pics

An alternative to the “throw-away culture created by the powers that control the economic and financial policies of the globalized world”

Reuters reports that Pope Francis, speaking to members of the Confederation of Italian Co-operatives, condemned economic systems that “suffocate hope” and a globalised culture that treated its employees as disposable. New models and methods are needed that offer an alternative to the “throw-away culture created by the powers that control the economic and financial policies of the globalized world.”

He adds:

“Co-operatives should continue to be the motor that raises and develops the weakest part of our local communities and civil society”

The Pope said that the establishment of more co-operatives could help to solve crises of unemployment among young people and offer women jobs with a work-life balance that enabled them to care for their families.

Finally he called for money to be ‘at the service of life, managed in the right way by real co-operatives where capital does not command men but men command capital.

International localisers meet in person or via Facebook

eoh conf portland

Speakers from around the world will be covering a range of interconnected topics – local food, technology, healthcare, local business, indigenous rights, environmental justice and much more. Workshops include:

  • envisioning local learning;
  • local community self-governance: the next step towards an economics of happiness;
  • taking the 10-day local food challenge: how local can we go?
  • open power: electoral reform & the open source toolkit;
  • the terroir economy;
  • how to run an offers and needs market;
  • animating the commons;
  • hard to swallow: race, class and gender in the food system;
  • the climate agent of change;
  • the eloquence of stones: excursions into the remarkable vibrancy of things, and
  • towards a caring economy: communities that nurture young and old.

Regular price tickets are on sale until February 9th.

Low income and student tickets and scholarships are available.

Or invite your friends on Facebookand watch for the videos, which will be posted online after the conference.

Transition town focus

A transition town is a grassroots community project that seeks to build resilience in the face of peak oil, climate destruction and economic instability. Local projects are usually based on the model’s 12 ‘ingredients’. The first initiative to use the name was Transition Town Totnes, founded in 2006.

totnes

Between late 2006 and early 2007 the Transition Network was founded as a UK charity by permaculture educator Rob Hopkins. It trains and supports people involved with Transition initiatives, disseminates the concepts of the transition model and assists the grassroots initiatives to network with one another.

local money coverSome Transition Towns engage with ‘fiscal localism’ – see Dr Peter North’s book, ’Local Money’, which ends by setting out how money that stays in the community can be created – building loyalty between consumers and local traders rather than losing wealth to the corporate chain stores. It charts the development of the first Transition currencies, the Totnes, Lewes, Stroud and Brixton Pounds. Note a sister post about the more recent Bristol pound. It also describes how alternative currencies could work with local banks and credit unions to strengthen the local economy, supporting the local production of necessities such as food and energy while helping to reduce the community’s carbon emissions.

The book draws on the long history of local currencies, from Local Exchange Trading Schemes and ‘time banks’ to paper currencies such as BerkShares, Ithaca ‘Hours’ and German regional currencies, which circulate between local businesses as an alternative to their losing trade to the ‘big box’ retailers.

In 2012 on this site we read about Herefordshire Transition Network’s intention is to develop ‘a thriving, resilient Herefordshire economy’ capable of meeting ‘the challenges of climate change, energy security and economic uncertainty’. The network includes a range of people and organisations across the country, many of whom were represented at a meeting attended by LWM’s Jon Stevens.

State of play now?

transition stourbridge header

Nearer, see news from Stourbridge: http://transitionstourbridge.co.uk/about/  

For news of transition projects around the country, go to http://www.transitionnetwork.org/ and for a list of transition initiatives worldwide, go to https://www.transitionnetwork.org/initiatives

Stroudco Food Hub

stroudco food hub logo

Stroudco Food Hub – which has one part-time paid member of staff and an increasing group of enthusiastic volunteers is seven years old. It currently supports some 57 local food and drink producers, ranging from well-known names such as Stroud Brewery and Winstone’s Ice Cream to allotment growers and school gardeners offering just a few bunches of carrots and home cooks selling surplus jars of jam.

About 522 households are now registered with the food hub, which presents Stroud residents with a full scale local alternative to supermarket shopping. Every week customers go online to choose from a wide range of products listed within the not-for-profit co-operative’s comprehensive catalogue and collect their orders from pick-up points such as Stroud Valleys School, the Quaker Meeting House in Nailsworth or the Brunel Mall, or have them delivered if within three miles of the school.

Almost everything available in the big stores can be purchased through Stroudco, with the community interest company linking up with local traders such as Global Organics and Hania Cheeses from the town’s Shambles Market and Bristol-based workers’ co-operative Essential Wholefoods to provide products that cannot be sourced on the doorstep.

Around 90% of the products in their catalogue come from within 15 miles of Stroud, though some items have to be found further afield. However, if a new producer starts to produce the same product locally, they are given preference.

Stroudco is one of a number of food hubs operating all over the world and has already inspired similar schemes in Dursley and the Forest of Dean.

Read far more here: http://www.gloucestershireecho.co.uk/Food-Stroudco-Food-Hub-provides-alternative/story-22788004-detail/story.html

LWM co-founder: rebuild and rediversify economies

euro memo group header

Last September, Colin Hines, co-founder of LWM, gave the final address (link to pdf here) at the 20th Conference on Alternative Economic Policy in Europe, at the Sapienza University in Rome (Department of Statistics), organised by the EuroMemo Group and jointly hosted with Economia Civile. His conclusion:

“A successful campaign to turn Treaty of Rome into a “treaty of home” would allow countries to cooperate to take back control of their borders for progressive goals, such as reducing inequality and rebuilding flourishing, sustainable local economies. This in turn could result in increased political support for a reformed Europe which actually gives citizens hope by providing economic, social and environmental policies which tackle the majority’s present fears for the future, rather than making them worse”.

Theme of top post this year: realising the potential of local economic power

Loc prosp header

Mainstreaming Community Economic Development is a major strand of LWM’s work that explores and supports an economic development approach that is based on making the most of local enterprise, existing business supply chains, networks, community assets and human potential.

Read on: http://localisewestmidlands.org.uk/mainstreaming_ced/

Its second project, Localising Prosperity: http://localisewestmidlands.org.uk/mainstreaming_ced/mced2-reports/

A lesson for Britain: Brazil promotes food security and local food procurement, strengthening family farming

graziano da silvaVested interests replacing the now defunct Flying Matters, a lobby group funded by the aviation industry, vigorously defend the profitable import of food from countries with malnourished people. A better way forward, socially, economically and environmentally is offered by the Director General of the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, Jose Graziano da Silva (Extraordinary Minister for Food Security), one of the champions of the Zero Hunger project in Brazil, which raised 28 million people above the poverty line during the 8 years of the Lula administration.

Small-scale family farmers, who accounted for a significant percentage of the agriculture/livestock production in Brazil particularly of staple food items, were usually excluded from agricultural policy discussions. They mobilised and a national program, the Pronaf, was created in 1995, offering the first credit line specifically designed for family farming in Brazil.

Local food procurement, a success in Brazil today

school meal brazilA School Meal Law (Pnae) was passed, requiring 30% of the public food purchases for school meals to be made locally from family farmers. It strengthened local and regional markets, fostered the circulation of profits in the region, recovered regional food habits and promoted the establishment of associations or cooperatives, which play an instrumental role in organizing food production and protecting the economy of the poorest sectors of the population.

Da Silva commented: “This ensures stable markets for farmers and at the same time ensures culturally-acceptable, nutritious and fresh meals for school-going children.

zero hunger coverA Family Agriculture Food Acquisition Program was set up and generates income for poor family farmers (household income not exceeding R$ 110,000) by selling their surplus food produce to the federal government and encouraging the creation or development of marketing channels for family farming products. It also provided a price guarantee tool for part of their produce.

A range of initiatives, included crop insurance and special credit lines were created for young people, women, organic crops, working capital and shares in cooperatives, agroindustrial projects, rural tourism, environmental recovery and semiarid regions.

The farmers’ organizations financed and set up stocks of products of the current harvest, strengthening food security systems and keeping food products in their localities, allowing any surplus to be sold when prices are more rewarding for farmers. Read more here and in the book (right) co-authored by Dr da Silva.

Several countries in Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa are adopting similar approaches.

modi da silva agric

 Dr. Jose Graziano da Silva recently met India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi and discussed India’s National Food Security Mission. Both agreed that food security comes first and national governments must have the flexibility to put in place suitable mechanisms to achieve it. Modi sought the FAO’s cooperation in designing a campaign for women which would highlight ways to improve families’ nutritional value and food habits. They discussed ways of linking family farming production to school meal programmes by creating local food procurement programmes and increasing the nutritional value of the mid-day meal scheme for school children.

Meanwhile, British farmers are encouraged by their unions and government agencies to produce more food for export, though prices then inevitably fall as supply rises, and the global market consistently rewards only the speculator or the unproductive middleman.