Responses and articles on MCED

Some recent articles about and responses to Mainstreaming Community Economic Development

–         Canadian CED Network – a response from Stewart Perry

–         New Start blog 5th April 2013

–         Chamberlain Files August 2013

–         Reconomy Blog April 2013

–         Review by Claire Spencer – August 2013

–         Fairbrum blog March 2013

–         Post Carbon Institute comment

–         Barrow Cadbury Trust blog July 2013

–         A Barrow Cadbury case study May 2014

–         Churches Regional Commission in North-east

–         TCPA journal article July 2013 (members only)

–         Viewpoint article for Local Economy Journal – August 2013

What people say about Mainstreaming CED

“Your work is very relevant to what I do because I’m fundamentally motivated by generating economic growth from localities outwards: I think it’s a better, healthier and more democratic way to organise society. Encraft has always effectively assumed localised economic development is the future: it’s part of our DNA.” – Matthew Rhodes, Managing Director of private sector consultancy Encraft

“I just wanted to send a quick note of congratulations for the  results of your Mainstreaming CED report.  Even though you mention in the paper that CED seems more developed in the US and Canada, sometimes an outside eye has a better perspective.  We need more of this kind of thorough and incisive thinking on the potential and limitations of CED.  Bravo. “ – Michael Toye, Executive Director of the Canadian CED Network

“This report illustrates what we see every day: our economy is too centralised, with many unable to influence, participate or benefit from its rewards. Attempts to localise are frustrated by patchy policy interventions, top-heavy decision-making, and an uneven playing field: larger companies set the agenda – smaller companies must adapt. The report draws on local examples to demonstrate that organisations of different sizes and scopes can collaborate to develop localised economies. A must read.” – Claire Spencer, sustainability activist, Birmingham.

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