Localising Prosperity – a short film

We are delighted to launch our new Localising Prosperity video – a seven-minute film exploring better ways to do economics.

Through four projects that exemplify aspects of the Localising Prosperity approach our film shows how we can create an economy which is lively and diverse, meets local needs with local resources, & in which more people have a stake.

Our thanks to all the contributors involved in making this film (see more below). Please share it widely!

Thanks also to our film-maker, Susan Jones of Redhead Business Films and to our funder the Barrow Cadbury Trust.

In such a short film we’ve not had space to fully describe the featured projects and who is behind each of them, so here’s a quick round-up and some useful links:

The New Hospital: anchoring prosperity in the community

This is about ensuring “anchor institutions’ like Sandwell & Birmingham’s new hospital (leaving aside current concerns about Carillion!) has the maximum positive impact on local people, by ensuring that retail options, procurement and related services are locally sourced and employ locally wherever possible. The organisations working on this – Sandwell Council, Citizen Home, Localise West Midlands and Smethwick CAN amongst others – are proposing that one of the hospital’s retail units is taken by a social enterprise shop  that could not only sell locally produced goods but act as a “concierge” type service for busy staff and visiting families, to access the services they need from local businesses.

Thanks to Conrad Parke, Martin Hogg, Karen McCarthy for appearances in this one.

Inclusive business support ecosystems in Balsall Heath

Citizens UK and the Centre for Research on Ethnic Minority Enterpreneurship have been working together with business people in Lozells, Small Heath and Sparkbrook to achieve better engagement with support agencies, aiming to generate an inclusive business support ecosystem in these areas. Nayer’s jewellery business is one of those involved. Thanks to Moses Dakurivosa and Nayer Khan-Farrukh for contributing here.

Energy Capital – local business innovation for social good

Headed by Matthew Rhodes, Energy Capital is about collaborative sector development, in which energy innovation delivers on the needs of real people and the environment, and policy shifts support it to do so, with locally owned businesses  involved at every level. RentE Cars is on of the local businesses that is ‘driving’ (forgive the pun) and taking advantage of electric car charging innovations. As well as Matthew we are grateful to Rob Jolly and Waqar Bukhari for taking part in this one.

Social care: an opportunity for inclusive economics?

Our final case study is about how social care, rather than being a problem, can be a positive force for inclusive economics that could help the West Midlands Combined Authority achieve its stated aims of sharing prosperity more widely – as a report by NEF for LWM outlines. The “foundational economy” is made up of the things society really needs, social care being one, and deserves a closer economic focus. Built around adaptable, small scale and community enterprises, social care may not provide conventional ‘growth’ but could have a huge impact on local jobs in places where they are needed, providing something we all need and care about. Crossroads Care is an example of a locally accountable and adaptable enterprise delivering care and economic opportunity. Our thanks to Christine Christie, Graham Evans, Carol Glover and her mum, and Joanne Ferguson for their time.

Together these stories show some of the ways that communities can have greater economic power and prosperity.

If you’re interested in our approach try our Localising Prosperity webpages for more information.

Karen Leach

 

 

Anchoring community wealth

Preston’s skyline: Carl Ji, a Chinese student, at the University of Central Lancashire

Austerity has been devolved to local councils and, perversely, areas with higher levels of poverty have been hit hardest, councils have on average faced 40% cuts in their budgets.

In the face of adversity councils such as Preston have responded by bringing together anchor institutions and working with them to drive through a local programme of economic transformation. The government’s Commission for Employment and Skills defines an ‘anchor institution’ as “one that, alongside its main function, plays a significant and recognised role in a locality by making a strategic contribution to the local economy” and ‘tending’ to be non-profit.

By changing their procurement policies, these anchor institutions were able to drive up spending locally protecting businesses and jobs. They are looking at the council pension fund to see if its investment can support local businesses keeping the money circulating in their town.

A study by the Centre for Local Economic Strategies found that six of the anchor institutions in the area are now spending 18% of their budget in Preston, up from 5% in 2013. So an extra £75 million a year is being spent within the city, with the top 300 local suppliers creating an extra 800 jobs last year alone. And others are watching: Manchester city council has now increased its local spend from 44% of its budget to 70%; Lowestoft and Salford are also interested.

Last year this blog reported that Birmingham City Council was to work with Centre for Local Economic Strategies, with funding from the Barrow Cadbury Trust and support from Localise West Midlands, to see how anchor institutions in the non-profit and private sectors, including Birmingham University, Pioneer Housing and the QE hospital, could use their spending power to increase economic opportunities for Birmingham’s communities, businesses and citizens. Read more on the council website here.

In a separate project, Localise West Midlands has been working with the Midland Metropolitan Hospital (under construction, artist’s impression) which will be the closest adult hospital to the centre of Birmingham. The Sandwell & West Birmingham NHS Trust and LWM are partners in Urban Innovative Actions supporting the development of the local economy. The Trust hopes to spend 2% of the new hospital’s annual budget with local suppliers, adding £5-8m to the local economy. It will provide locally sourced meals and the builder has a target of 70% local employment, aiming to source 80% of construction materials locally.

Alice Thomson in The Times pointed out that making a legal requirement that councils buy and hire goods and services locally is banned by EU law at the moment, so it should be noted that the Preston project operates on a voluntary basis.

She commented: “The government should take the idea and encourage it, particularly in hollowed-out market towns where out of town shopping centres have crushed their sense of identity” adding “But (procurement policies) could also be used for more high-profile programmes such as the rebuilding of Big Ben, where the steel has had to come from Brazil, Germany and the United Arab Emirates, or the V&A which showcases Britain’s greatest designs but where the tiles for the new forecourt came from Holland”.

 

 

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Changing local economies to work for people who feel excluded

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A link has been received to a Guardian report about the ‘Preston model’ – for background information see Clifford Singer’s interesting article on the Next System Project’s website.

Councillor Matthew Brown, Preston city council cabinet member for social justice, inclusion and community engagement, devised this model. 12 of the city’s key employers were helped to reorganise their supply chains and identify where they could buy goods and services locally, stopping 61% of their procurement budget being spent outside the Lancashire economy. The employers included ‘anchor institutions’ such as:

  • the county constabulary,
  • a public sector housing association,
  • colleges
  • and hospitals

Since 2011, Lancashire council’s central government grant had been reduced from £30m to £18m, leading to cuts in everything from community engagement to parks and the leisure centre. “The intention was to devolve cuts and blame it on us,” Brown says. “But you can become more self-sufficient.”

The Public Services (Social Value) Act 2013 now allows public bodies in England to take into account the social, environmental and economic impact of their commissioning. A key step was to redirect lucrative contracts, such as printing services for the police and food for council buildings, towards local business and the city council doubled its procurement spending with Preston companies from 14% in 2012-13 to 28% in 2014-15.

Brown and his colleagues want to build a city where workers are in control of wealth, improving people’s sense of citizenship. “We’ve got the public pension fund to invest in student housing, we’re looking at setting up a local bank to give business loans and for the local authority to become an energy provider,” he says. “You put all that together and you can see how we are developing the infrastructure for a new economy.”

The model was inspired by cooperatively run communities in Cleveland, Ohio and the world’s largest co-operative group, Mondragón, in the Basque region of Spain, and has been cited in speeches by the shadow chancellor John McDonnell and other councils, including Birmingham, Rochdale and Sheffield have taken an interest in the initiative.

Matthew Brown has worked with the Centre for Local Economic Strategies, a Manchester-based think tank with considerable experience of working collaboratively with local authorities and other institutions to boost local economies.

CLES is  working in Birmingham with Localise West Midlands because for many years LWM has made the case for more inclusive, ‘locally grown’ economies – see its ground-breaking report, Mainstreaming Community Economic Development. The focus is on those ‘anchor institutions’ which have a major impact on the city.  As part of a separate initiative, LWM is working with the New Economics Foundation, CLES and New Start. They have brought together a group of local practitioners from the region which has suggested a focus on health and social care. Read on here.

Brown believes that as a result of the financial crisis and its aftermath people are ready to hear a radically different way of thinking about politics and that Corbyn can win a Labour party victory in 2020. Until then, Preston is backing the northern powerhouse initiative to secure devolution, allowing it to build what Brown believes are the foundations of a new economy away from the City and Westminster.

“The days of getting huge inward investments are over, so the sensible way is looking at how you can do that through your local area to make something new,” he says. “This is it.”

 

 

 

Preston: building a new local economics

new start logoNew Start magazine, which champions urban regeneration that is inclusive, sustainable and socially just, has reported on the work of CLES (Centre for Local Economic Strategies) with Preston City Council. Innovative Quinton councillor John Clancy, who has been to Preston to meet councillors there at a CLES conference, has already tweeted the New Start article.

CLES is exploring how anchor institutions based in the city can bring benefits for the local economy and community.

Anchor institutions are those that – once established – tend not to move location, anchoring the local economy. They may be not-for-personal profit social enterprises, co-operatives, employee-owned and run companies,  or simply local firms with a determined loyalty to their community and workforce ‘family’ (some 2nd generation) – like Professional Polishing in 2007, which refused a highly profitable offshoring opportunity for this reason – resigning from BCC because of their promotion of these policies – and has gone from strength to strength.

cles logoThe starting point was ‘procurement spend’ – seeking to create a collective vision across institutions for undertaking procurement in a way which benefits the local economy. The supply chains of each of the anchor institutions (worth £750m pa) were analysed by CLES in order to identify particular sectors where there are gaps in expenditure in the local economy and where there is scope to influence that ‘spend’ in the future.

There were two broad objectives:

  • to analyse the extent to which anchor institutions already spend with suppliers based in the Preston and Lancashire economies and whether there is potential to repatriate some of that spend;
  • to identify whether there are any particular services used by anchor institutions which would lend themselves to future delivery by local worker-led co-operatives.

Analysing the procurement spend of six anchor institutions with their top 300 suppliers – some £750m – the research found that only 5% of their collective spend was with Preston organisations and 39% was spent with organisations based in Lancashire. £488m was effectively leaking out of Lancashire each year.

Preston skyline
Preston skyline

The findings of the supply chain analysis have prompted anchor institutions to ensure procurement spending reaps greater local economic and community reward. Local organisation Community Gateway, for instance, now asks suppliers to show the local economic multiplier effect of the delivery of its capital and maintenance projects.

Preston Council has identified local organisations in those sectors which could bid for and deliver those services in the future.

Lancashire Council has reframed its procurement practices so that there is greater emphasis on economic and social value.

Postscript: other initiatives

  • Living Wage – Preston City Council has been a Living Wage employer since 2009. It seeks to ensure other organisations across the public, commercial and social economies pay their own employees. The principle of the activity links to community wealth in that it seeks to provide a fair level of pay for Preston residents and also ensure the circulation of income within the local economy.
  • Move your Money – Preston City Council has become part of the Move your Money campaign. This seeks to encourage communities to bank in a more ethical way. The Council has also helped establish a new credit union (‘Guildmoney).

• Guild co-operative network – the council and its Social Forum supports worker led co-operatives and encourages other anchor institutions to utilise local co-operatives, most of which are engaged in front line provision.

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