Event: launch of post Brexit & Trump report commissioned by MEP

The Brexit vote and the election of Trump have been hailed as marking the reversal of the long trend towards increased globalisation.

These changes possibly also mark the end of neoliberalism as the dominant ideology of our times. For opponents of what globalisation and neoliberalism have meant in practice these developments might be seen as welcome. Yet at the same time Brexit and Trump seem highly problematic for anyone concerned with social justice and ecological sustainability.

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A new report by Green House authors Victor Anderson and Rupert Read, commissioned by MEP Molly Scott Cato will be launched on Tuesday 28 March from 14.00 – 16.30 at Europe House in central London.

The report considers the impact of the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on trading practices and the opportunity to move to a less globalised and more localised economy. It emphasises that there are many different versions of Brexit, and aims to put a green version firmly on the political agenda.

Note: Panel discussion with Nick Dearden (Global Justice Now) and Helena Norberg-Hodge (Local Futures and International Alliance for Localisation of which Localise West Midlands is a member). Helena’s contribution will be by pre-recorded video due to prior commitments.

 

Register and get full details here.

 

 

 

Towards a localised future: the rising global-to-local movement

A New Economy Convergence

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This one-day meeting in London will provide an opportunity to take part in the rising global-to-local movement and to discuss the strategies required to move away from a corporate-led growth economy towards diverse local economies in service of people and planet.

There will be news of inspiring initiatives worldwide aimed at resisting global trade treaties and reclaiming our communities, cultures and natural environment. Meet others who care about democracy, social justice, fulfilling and dignified livelihoods, nutritious fresh food, meaningful education and about passing on a healthy and diverse environment to our children.

Speakers include Helena Norberg-Hodge, James Skinner, Molly Scott Cato, and Rupert Read (read more about the speakers here). The short version of The Economics of Happiness will be screened, and the event will include world café brainstorming sessions.

 

Saturday, September 17th, 2016 9.00 am to 5.00 pm

Friends House 173-177 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BJ (use Garden entrance)

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Tickets: £20 for a standard ticket; £15 for concessions. Full scholarships also available upon application; please email info@localfutures.org.

Book Tickets

 

 

 

Update 2: International Alliance for Localisation

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In December this blog reported that Local Futures has gathered a cross-cultural, North-South network of thinkers, activists and NGOs – the International Alliance for Localization (IAL). It already has members from over 30 countries and Localise West Midlands is one of the member organisations.

This new cross-cultural network of groups and individuals focusses on resistance, renewal, and radically new visions of development and progress.

The response has exceeded IAL’s most optimistic expectations. In less than two months, individuals from 28 different countries have joined. These include farmers, teachers, builders, community organizers, environmental stewards, peace activists, homesteaders, students, health workers, business consultants, writers, engineers, artists, radio producers, researchers, and more.

Many organizations have also signed up: groups focused on social justice, ecological restoration, spiritual values, sustainable food and farming, holistic education, and policy research and advocacy. Among these are:

Swadeshi Jagaran Manch (India);

Digo Bikas Institute (Nepal);

Localize West Midlands (UK);

The Sustainability Institute and

Greyton Transition Town (South Africa);

Noakhali Rural Development Society (Bangladesh);

Centre for Global Justice (Mexico/USA);

Gaia Education (UK);

Holy Cross International Justice Office (USA);

Small Farm Training Center (USA), and many more.

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This broad-based interest in the IAL shows that people worldwide are beginning to recognize that localization is a viable strategy for positive change on a global level.

Next: March 30th fourth webinar in the Global to Local Webinar Series: Debt and Speculation in the Global Economy, with Helena Norberg-Hodge and Charles Eisenstein

Considering policy-level changes needed for localisation initiatives to flourish and spread

helena 1Those interested in ‘digging more deeply’ into the localisation movement are invited to make space in their calendar for a five-day Schumacher College course with Swedish-born localisation pioneer Helena Norberg-Hodge, who has worked in diverse cultures around the world and is almost uniquely able to address localisation from the perspective of both the global North and South.

We remember her organisation’s promotion – in Britain – of the ‘new’ farmers markets which she had seen working well in the United States, and other aspects of the local food movement in the early 80s. For the last few years she has been ‘spreading the word’ in Australia and America and has recently been invited to speak in China, Japan, Korea, Italy, Austria, Sweden and Turkey – at Taksim Square.

The course will examine the multiple benefits of shifting away from the corporate-led global economy, towards diverse and localised eco-economies rooted to place. It will survey many of the inspiring, community-based initiatives already underway, and consider policy-level changes needed for those initiatives to flourish and spread.

Links between the many seemingly disconnected crises we face – from global warming to financial instability, from the epidemic of depression to ethnic conflict – will be explored.

This five-day course looks at some of the most difficult questions facing the localisation movement and will include lectures, interactive discussion, documentary films, and participatory experiential exercises.

Contact:
http://cts.vresp.com/c/?TheInternationalSoci/c5d1803864/TEST/158a15989c

DISCOUNTS A discount is available to those working in localisation organisations and initiatives.

Related article with added info: http://neweranetwork.info/2013/07/02/news-from-helena-norberg-hodge-3/

 

Achieving food security by relocalisation and building up the resilience of our agricultural resources – three voices

At a meeting of Hadlow College’s Rural Focus Group, their Sustainability Champion, Dr Howard Lee, noted that DEFRA is committed to food security in principle but not to food self-sufficiency.

The strategic contradiction is that succeeding governments have preferred to promote the export of agricultural and horticultural commodities.

Coventry University’s Dr Julia Wright recommends building up the resilience of our natural agricultural resource base

In the Fresh Produce Journal she says that the droughts and the floods we have experienced this year have been “exacerbated by the way we manage the hydrological cycle on farms and across landscapes”. Drawing on extensive drylands experience in Australia she advocates setting up appropriate-scale water-storage mechanisms, building more fertile soils with a greater soil-water retention capacity and introducing soil cultivation techniques that enable retention of groundwater. Read more in another article.

The ‘grow local, eat local’ message – Russ Grayson

Some years ago, Russ Grayson, in the Energy Bulletin, reported that the most visible manifestation of ongoing food relocalisation is the growing number of farmers’ markets that now dot our towns and suburbs:

“Farmers’ market organisers have promoted the “eat local” message ever since the markets started in this country, over a decade ago. The food in question is known as either “local” or “regional”. The terms are interchangeable but refer to food produced within relatively close proximity to the towns or cities where it is eaten.

“Eating local has always had the economic incentive of supporting local growers and food processors consequently boosting regional economies. This is one reason that people in rural towns like the idea and encourage farmers’ markets.

“Not all of our food can be produced locally, of course – climate prevents this – and staples such as grains are usually imported from further afield.

“The argument of the food relocalisers is that food that can be produced in a region should be substituted for imports from overseas”

The fact ‘food miles’ don’t always guarantee the lowest energy use has led thoughtful proponents, like local food pioneer Helena Norberg-Hodge, to say that the issue is the transportation of “like foods” that could be grown in the regions into which they are imported – as did another who thinks ‘ahead of her time’ – Caroline Lucas, with LWM’s co-founder Colin Hines, in STOPPING THE GREAT FOOD SWAP – RELOCALISING EUROPE’S FOOD SUPPLY.

Years ago the Telegraph reported research at the University of Essex and City University revealing that buying locally produced food would save the UK £2.1 billion in environmental and congestion costs. The report’s authors, Professor Jules Pretty and Professor Tim Lang, called for supermarkets to put food miles on product labels, so customers can make informed choices. To read more about the impact of internationally traded food moved by sea go to Grayson’s article.

Attempting to move the local food issue away from those relating to climate change, nutrition and good farming

Grayson remembers Australia’s Federal Agriculture Minister,Tony Burke, making “a poor attempt to reframe the local food issue to move it away from the global warming, human nutrition and Australian farming elements that lie at its core”. Local food advocates were also accused of “protectionism”, influencing consumers, so creating “a consumer-driven barrier to trade”.

Developing new markets and increasing farm viability

Russ Grayson concludes: “For farmers within reasonably close proximity to towns and cities, the growing preference for local food represents new markets and farm viability, especially for the smaller farmer and especially for the organic farmer whose sector is the fastest growing. This is true for the Sydney region market gardeners who supply the city with 90% of its fresh vegetables and almost 100% of its Asian vegetables and who, with the associated marketing and distribution sectors of the local food industry, generate an estimated $4.5 billion annually (Sydney Basin Industry Details, Gillespie, P, Mason, David NSW Agriculture, Orange 2003) . . .”#