A local alternative to Uber?

Transport for London has decided not to give Uber a new license, though its app (Uber requires drivers and users to have a smartphone) will still be operational in London while Uber appeals against the decision.

More information about its problems and bans in several cities and countries may be seen on the West Midlands New Economics site.

The New Economics Foundation has called for a mutually-owned, publicly-regulated alternative to Uber, providing better working conditions for drivers and higher safety standards for passengers.

Stefan Baskerville (NEF: Unions and Business) said:

“Digital platforms are here to stay and technology cannot be reversed. The question now is how they should be controlled and by whom, as well as the standards they set and how they treat people. It is time to develop alternative models which put people back in control”.

As NEF points out, drivers in different parts of the UK are developing their own platforms.

In 2015 Cab:app was co-founded by London taxi driver Peter Schive, who said: ‘Cab:app draws on the heritage and expertise of the black cab industry and translates it for the digital world.

Other early examples included the Bristol Taxi App – abbreviated to Braxi – which will only employ drivers licensed by Bristol City Council. Farouq Hussain, ‘one of the brains behind the app’, described it as being “just like Uber, only local”, with no surcharge and 25% pay cut. He added: “Our app takes the best of Uber and makes it local”.

The most recent: in June Anlaby-based 966 Taxis in Hull designed and launched its Uber-style app which they believe could transform the service. Alice Martin (NEF: Lead for Work) said: “TFL’s move will send ripples across the country where there has been a recent surge in private hire licenses given out to support Uber’s growth, particularly in the Midlands, Yorkshire and the North West” adding:

We’ve been working with drivers in different parts of the UK who are developing their own platforms. The time has come for the Mayor to back a better alternative to Uber and lead the way for other local authorities to do the same”.

 

 

 

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Does Birmingham Love the Brum Pound?

News from the Birmingham Pound, thanks to a little group of dedicated people – and you can perhaps help us… We’ve been joined by two brilliant new members with real live time to commit to the project: Ridhi Kalaria and Matthew Rowe. Ridhi, founder of Ort Cafe, ran our event for Small Business Saturday which saw 90-odd percent of attendees support the idea, and has gone on to star in this excellent short video explaining the Birmingham Pound idea for our Love Brum application.

Love Brum is a membership-based funder: members put money into the pot, and then vote for their favourite projects. They like to fund things that make Birmingham a better place (an EVEN better place!) and like the Birmingham Pound, they are keen to reach all corners of the city. If you are a member, please have a look and consider voting for this! Consider joining anyway – it’s a great fundraising idea.

Matthew, previously of the Envirolution Network in Manchester, has now relocated to our much more exciting city. IbuprofenHe has produced a comprehensive and slightly mind-boggling spreadsheet of Birmingham Pound costings under different funding scenarios, which other members are now  scrutinising carefully…

Matthew and Ridhi have also produced us a Brum Pound website, Twitter profile and Facebook page, so please sign up, follow or like as is your preference!

And keep watching this space – plenty more progress to follow shortly.

Karen Leach

Joint coordinator

lessons from Cleveland’s Evergreen Co-operatives – open meeting 26 Feb

From what I’ve heard about the Evergreen Co-ops this will be a really interesting event for anyone interested in practical steps towards a more just and sustainable economy. I’ll certainly be there.
Karen
The Birmingham Co-operative Party invites you to an open meeting:

Re-building local economies:


Learning lessons from the Evergreen Co-operatives
in Cleveland Ohio
One of the worrying trends of recent decades – accelerated during the current recession – has been the collapse of local economies, particularly in traditional manufacturing areas such as the Midlands and the North of the UK.

This problem is not limited to the UK and this meeting will be exploring what lessons can be learned from an innovative experiment in Cleveland Ohio which is successfully creating secure well-paid jobs by developing a network of local co-operative enteprises to serve city institutions such as the hospital, university and local council.

With

Jim Pettipher
Deputy Executive Director, Co-operative Futures

7.35pm, Tuesday 26th February

A light buffet will be served from 6.30pm

at

Midlands Co-operative Member Relations Centre,
Birmingham & Midland Institute,
Margaret St, Birmingham, B3 3BS

All Welcome!

For catering purposes, please confirm your attendance by email to richardbickle [at] cooptel.net