Are the region’s schools and hospitals sourcing food locally?

BBC Scotland made freedom of information requests to all 32 Scottish councils about the sourcing of food products bought last year.

Despite campaigns by the Scottish Government to buy local produce. Of the 28 authorities which responded, it was found £1.3 million was spent on chicken products from Thailand, more than £125,000 on carrots from Belgium, £125,000 on mashed potato from France and almost £12,000 on raspberries from Serbia.

scottish 2food        Read more about Scottish food here: http://www.taste-of-scotland.com/foodproducers.html

Farmers said they want to see more done by councils to source local produce and  the Scottish Greens first raised the issue of councils buying chicken from Thailand in 2013.The party’s health spokeswoman Alison Johnstone said:

“It’s disappointing that, three years on from our investigation, this remains a problem. Our economy is losing out. Government food policy remains too focused on exports rather than supporting local procurement. Councils need support so they can buy Scottish more often.”

A review of food and drink nutrition in schools is now under way. John Swinney, the education secretary, said that he wants school food to be “sourced as locally as possible” and has asked experts from Food Standards Scotland, NHS Health Scotland and Education Scotland where provision can be improved.

LWM is working with a number of partners to promote this agenda.  While the Carter Review of 2015 put obstacles in the way of localising NHS procurement, with its insistence on frameworks and catalogues, it recognised the value of locally sourced food.  County Hospital, Stafford was one of the first to gain a gold Food for Life Catering Mark, an initiative of the Soil Association recognised by NHS England.  This experience is being passed on through the West Midlands NHS Sustainability Network.

The fragmentation of the schools system means it’s less clear how many schools are following this approach, though many are growing their own salads and fruit as part of healthy eating projects.  In Smethwick, Victoria Park Academy has its own social enterprise, Ballot Street Spice, and it’s hoped they will sell their spice mixes at the Midland Met Hospital food market when it opens.  The Department for Education has recognised the Food for Life Catering Mark, and the government plan for Procurement cites it as a best practice tool.