Preston: building a new local economics

new start logoNew Start magazine, which champions urban regeneration that is inclusive, sustainable and socially just, has reported on the work of CLES (Centre for Local Economic Strategies) with Preston City Council. Innovative Quinton councillor John Clancy, who has been to Preston to meet councillors there at a CLES conference, has already tweeted the New Start article.

CLES is exploring how anchor institutions based in the city can bring benefits for the local economy and community.

Anchor institutions are those that – once established – tend not to move location, anchoring the local economy. They may be not-for-personal profit social enterprises, co-operatives, employee-owned and run companies,  or simply local firms with a determined loyalty to their community and workforce ‘family’ (some 2nd generation) – like Professional Polishing in 2007, which refused a highly profitable offshoring opportunity for this reason – resigning from BCC because of their promotion of these policies – and has gone from strength to strength.

cles logoThe starting point was ‘procurement spend’ – seeking to create a collective vision across institutions for undertaking procurement in a way which benefits the local economy. The supply chains of each of the anchor institutions (worth £750m pa) were analysed by CLES in order to identify particular sectors where there are gaps in expenditure in the local economy and where there is scope to influence that ‘spend’ in the future.

There were two broad objectives:

  • to analyse the extent to which anchor institutions already spend with suppliers based in the Preston and Lancashire economies and whether there is potential to repatriate some of that spend;
  • to identify whether there are any particular services used by anchor institutions which would lend themselves to future delivery by local worker-led co-operatives.

Analysing the procurement spend of six anchor institutions with their top 300 suppliers – some £750m – the research found that only 5% of their collective spend was with Preston organisations and 39% was spent with organisations based in Lancashire. £488m was effectively leaking out of Lancashire each year.

Preston skyline
Preston skyline

The findings of the supply chain analysis have prompted anchor institutions to ensure procurement spending reaps greater local economic and community reward. Local organisation Community Gateway, for instance, now asks suppliers to show the local economic multiplier effect of the delivery of its capital and maintenance projects.

Preston Council has identified local organisations in those sectors which could bid for and deliver those services in the future.

Lancashire Council has reframed its procurement practices so that there is greater emphasis on economic and social value.

Postscript: other initiatives

  • Living Wage – Preston City Council has been a Living Wage employer since 2009. It seeks to ensure other organisations across the public, commercial and social economies pay their own employees. The principle of the activity links to community wealth in that it seeks to provide a fair level of pay for Preston residents and also ensure the circulation of income within the local economy.
  • Move your Money – Preston City Council has become part of the Move your Money campaign. This seeks to encourage communities to bank in a more ethical way. The Council has also helped establish a new credit union (‘Guildmoney).

• Guild co-operative network – the council and its Social Forum supports worker led co-operatives and encourages other anchor institutions to utilise local co-operatives, most of which are engaged in front line provision.

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